WNPR

Politics

Updated at 8:15 a.m. ET

As the day dawned across the U.S. on Friday, a new economic reality dawned with it: The tariffs long threatened against billions of dollars in Chinese goods took effect just at midnight ET while many Americans were sleeping — but Beijing was ready immediately with a wake-up call of its own.

Fort Meade Public Affairs Office / Creative Commons

Populism is on the rise from Europe to India to the United States.

A new liberal rallying cry — "Abolish ICE!" — calls for an end to Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the agency that enforces President Trump's immigration policies.

Many protesters held signs with the slogan at marches across the country over the weekend, and several leading Democrats echoed the grass-roots catchphrase.

Lori Mack / CT Public Radio

The recent retirement announcement of Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy has sparked questions about the future of abortion rights. During his tenure, Kennedy voted to uphold abortion rights in several cases. Now agencies like New Haven’s Planned Parenthood of Southern New England are worried that the Trump administration will seek to appoint a justice who will overturn the 1973 Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision, the ruling that established a woman’s constitutional right to abortion.

Rick McCharles / Creative Commons

America has never been able to fully measure up to the ideals we embody. Yet, we could reasonably believe that we at least aspired to those ideals of equality, opportunity, and civility.  Today, we can no longer deny that those in power care little about the people they govern. 

Michael Cohen, the personal lawyer and longtime fixer for the president who once said he would "do anything" to protect Donald Trump, now says his "first loyalty" rests with his family.

In an interview with ABC News, Cohen acknowledged that he soon could face criminal charges in an ongoing FBI probe of his finances and business dealings. But Cohen told ABC anchor George Stephanopoulos that he respects the prosecutors and the process.

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

Three members of Connecticut's congressional delegation have been denied access to visit migrant children being cared for in the state on behalf of the federal Department Health and Human Services.

Updated at 4 a.m. ET

Leftist Andrés Manuel López Obrador — who campaigned partly on a platform of standing up to President Trump — will become Mexico's next president after easily outpacing his two main rivals.

With about a third of the votes counted, López Obrador was polling about 53 percent to 24 percent for conservative candidate Ricardo Anaya and 15 percent for Jose Antonio Meade of the ruling Institutional Revolutionary (PRI) party.

Department of Health and Human Services

Governor Dannel Malloy recently wrote to Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar to say he’s prepared to dedicate state resources to reunite migrant children with their parents. Some immigration lawyers say that’s easier said than done.

George W Bush Presidential Library / Creative Commons

Connecticut will hold primaries on August 14 to determine which candidates get on the ballot in this November's midterm elections. Since Connecticut runs a closed primary system, only voters registered with a party get to vote in that party's primary. Unaffiliated and Independent voters are out of luck.

Mary Glassman, Democratic candidate for Connecticut’s 5th Congressional Distric
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut's primaries are drawing near and, well, you may have noticed there are a lot of candidates to keep track of.

This hour, we introduce you to two of them: 5th Congressional District hopefuls Mary Glassman (D) and Jahana Hayes (D).

Who are they? And why did they decide to run? We find out and we also hear from you. 

SEEC Investigating Obsitnik Campaign's Finances

Jun 28, 2018
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

The State Elections Enforcement Commission voted unanimously Wednesday to investigate whether the campaign of Republican gubernatorial candidate Steve Obsitnik has illegally raised campaign contributions or improperly coordinated activities with FixCT., Inc., an independent expenditure committee promoting Obsitnik.

Paolo Zialcita / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut union organizers say they’ll persevere in the face of a stinging defeat at the Supreme Court.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Both Connecticut’s U.S. senators are urging Democrats to resist the appointment of a new Supreme Court justice until after November’s elections.

Updated at 5:54 p.m. ET

Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy announced his retirement Wednesday, setting the stage for what promises to be an epic political battle over his replacement.

A Trump nominee is likely to be far more conservative than Kennedy, who, though appointed by President Ronald Reagan, voted with the court's liberals in some key cases.

Pages