WNPR

Politics

Chion Wolf

Hartford is at a time of transition. Recovering from corruption, transforming its education planning for the future.

Today, Where We Live teams up with The Hartford Public Library for “The Year Ahead: A Conversation with Hartford’s State Legislators.” 

We'll be talking with members of the state congressional delegation from the city. They'll share their thoughts about the state of Hartford, and what lawmakers are doing to solve some of the city’s problems - from violence, to education scores, to literacy rates.

U.S. Navy via WikiMedia Commons

Gov. Dannel P. Malloy said today he will explore legislative options to curtail what he called state government's unsustainable, long-term health and pension costs, but he refused to say if he will seek a curb on collective-bargaining rights for state employees.

"We attempted to do that through negotiation. That has failed," Malloy said. "The people of Connecticut still need systemic change and still need to have a sustainable relationship with their employee base, which is a way of saying there is more than one way to get that done."

Flickr Creative Commons, Jan Seifert

Today, the Supreme Court struck down an Arizona public financing law similar to the one in Connecticut. But campaign finance reform can be a little dry and hard to follow, so first, a little colorful history:

Labor Leaders Respond

Jun 24, 2011
Photo by Chion Wolf

Flickr Creative Commons, David Boyle

Wrapping Up The Session

Jun 9, 2011
Chion Wolf

Connecticut’s legislative session has drawn to an end….on time. 

Yeah, really.  Governor Dannel Malloy did a little bit of celebrating, shortly after midnight, then called for a special session on job creation and declared that education reform should be the priority of the next legislative session.

Connecticut Mirror Political reporter Mark Pazniokas has called the governor’s style “hyperkinetic.”  We’ll look at what got done during this first act of his administration.

Cutting The Deficit, Interactively

Jun 7, 2011

Connecticut's first district congressman, John Larson, will host a forum this afternoon at the University of Hartford that hopes to accomplish what Congress can't seem to - namely cutting the national deficit.

Roundtable On Restructing, Consolidating, Rebuilding

Jun 3, 2011
Chion Wolf

So, the state legislative session’s about to end, and we’ve got a balanced budget, and all is right with the world - right?

Judging by his press conference with reporters yesterday, Governor Dannel Malloy thinks there’s still work to be done.  He told state workers that if they don’t ratify the concessions package he’s hoping with plug the budget hole - there will be layoffs.  Lots more than the 4700 that were already threatened.  

Smart Giving

Jun 1, 2011

We give billions to charity every year, but are we actually solving the world’s problems? When we look at the programs meant to fight global poverty and disease, we tend to see two poles...either we just need more money thrown into the aid programs we now have, or we realize that all these billions are just going down the drain.

Malloy Is Hurtling Through Time and Space

May 31, 2011
Chion Wolf

The question asked by an exasperated state legislator at an informational hearing last week was the one posed frequently, if not publicly, at the state Capitol about Connecticut's always-in-a-hurry governor: "Why can't this wait?" The query, by Rep. Roberta Willis, D-Salisbury, concerned Gov. Dannel P. Malloy's fast-track plan to remake the UConn Health Center, but it could have applied to any major initiative, beginning with the budget.

Flickr Creative Commons, yamrock83

Thirty-four states use the death penalty. Sixteen do not. Connecticut does, but most of its neighboring states -- New York, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Maine and Vermont -- do not. New Hampshire does, but the state has had no executions since 1939 and currently possesses no means of executing anyone. Only recently did the ranks of its death row swell to one.

Flickr Creative Commons, yamrock83

Thirty-four states use the death penalty. Sixteen do not. Connecticut does, but most of its neighboring states -- New York, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Maine and Vermont -- do not. New Hampshire does, but the state has had no executions since 1939 and currently possesses no means of executing anyone. Only recently did the ranks of its death row swell to one.

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