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politicians

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

U.S. Rep. Elizabeth Esty used her personal email address in a confidential severance agreement with former Chief of Staff Tony Baker.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s Fifth District representative, Elizabeth Esty has announced she will not stand for re-election in November. The decision follows days of intense pressure on Esty, over her handling of a harassment case in 2016 involving her then-chief of staff. 

John Phelan / Creative Commons

A day after the State Senate blocked the nomination of Andrew McDonald as Connecticut's next chief justice, Senate Democrats are hoping a for procedural do over. Democratic Senate President Martin Looney is calling for one of the 19 senators who voted against McDonald's nomination to file a motion to reconsider. 

John Phelan / Creative Commons

Robocalls, rallies, even an offer by Governor Malloy to make a Republican his next pick to the state's Supreme Court couldn't prevent Andrew McDonald's chief justice nomination from going down in flames.

Sucking Up

Mar 27, 2018
Bob Jenkins / Creative Commons

At President Trump's first full cabinet meeting in June 2017, we watched with some amusement while each member expressed over-the-top gratitude for the president's giving them the privilege to serve him and/or the American people. 

Fibonacci Blue / Creative Commons

A lot has happened in the recent days. The news is fast, complicated, disturbing and in some cases, hopeful.

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

The November midterms are fast-approaching -- raising concerns about election security and the safeguarding of local voter identity.

This hour, we look at how Connecticut is responding with Secretary of the State Denise Merrill.

Plus: a Middletown-based prison program gives incarcerated adults the opportunity to work towards an Associate degree behind bars.

We learn about the Wesleyan Center for Prison Education and its recent degree-granting collaboration with Middlesex Community College.

And finally: Have recent weather reports left you feeling underwhelmed? Don’t be upset with your local forecaster, says Quinnipiac University professor Ben Bogardus.

Coming up, Bogardus joins us along with NBC Connecticut Chief Meteorologist Ryan Hanrahan. And we want to hear from you. 

Updated at 8:08 p.m. ET

President Trump has chosen John Bolton, a hawk on North Korea and Iran, to be his next national security adviser.

The appointment comes just as those two foreign policy challenges come to a head.

Bolton replaces H.R. McMaster, who Trump said Thursday via Twitter is leaving the administration. Bolton takes over from McMaster effective April 9, the president also said.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This is stuff Hollywood couldn't script. Mark Boughton, a leading Republican candidate in the race to be Connecticut's next governor collapsed at a political event in Avon. One of his rivals, Prasad Srinivasan, who happens to be a doctor, rushed over to provide medical care.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

They've gone years without a raise. Now, members of Connecticut's private group home workforce are calling for a boost in support from the state.

With a possible strike looming this April, we speak to Josh Kovner from the Hartford Courant for an update. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut’s Fourth District Representative Jim Himes believes Congress has an opportunity this week to afford legal protection for special prosecutor Robert Mueller in the face of increasing attacks against him by President Donald Trump. 

Film Sufi / filmsufi.com

Cambridge Analytica, a data company backed by Republican donor Robert Mercer and headed by Steve Bannon, harvested private information from almost 50 million Facebook users without their permission to develop and exploit psychological profiles in the 2016 U.S. election.

Hermitosis / Google Images For Reuse

There was a lot of pressure on Ava Duvernay to bring Madeleine L'Engle's 1962 classic book, A Wrinkle In Time, to the screen. This is the first $100-million movie directed by an African-American woman with a diverse cast chosen to fill the roles written for whites in 1962.

Updated at 1:21 p.m. ET

Rep. Louise Slaughter, D-N.Y., a glass-ceiling-shattering leader in Congress, died Friday at age 88, while serving her 16th term in the House of Representatives, her chief of staff said in a statement.

She was surrounded by family at George Washington University Hospital at the time of her death, after sustaining an injury at her Washington, D.C., home last week.

WWIIHITLERTHIRDREICHHISTORY / flickr

How did a figure like Hitler emerge so quickly and so forcefully onto the world stage? How, in what was thought to be an enlightened and civilized society, did such demagoguery manage to incite an army to commit one of history's greatest atrocities?

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