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politicians

Lamont's Contributions To His Own Campaign: $12.1 Million

20 hours ago
Democratic candidate Ned Lamont talks to voters outside of Electric Boat in Groton, Conn.
Amar Batra / Connecticut Public Radio

Democrat Ned Lamont contributed $8.2 million to his gubernatorial campaign last month, bringing his total investment to $12.1 million since launching his candidacy in January, according to a campaign finance report filed Wednesday night.

Ralph Alswang / Center for American Progress Action Fund

Former Secretary of State John Kerry said what he calls “tribalism” in government is threatening our democracy. He told an audience at Yale University Monday that he believes the destruction of the traditions of the Senate has put compromise out of reach in current politics. 

Serial Productions / This American Life / WBEZ Chicago

So we did a Nose last week. It was good. It was about the second season of Slow Burn and the third season of Serial, and it was kind of also about how both of those shows tie into our present moment in interesting ways and that that's kind of interesting and suchlike.

We thought it went well.

You probably would've thought so too.

Except you didn't hear it, so how would you know? That present moment that I was just talking about got in the way: We were preempted by some Senate Judiciary Committee vote or something.

So we brought the show back for this week. We hope you'll like it now too.

Julie Jordan Scott / Creative Commons

A lot of you reading this are familiar with the Little House books by Laura Ingalls Wilder because you watched the popular "Little House on the Prairie" television show that ran from 1974-1983.

But the television show came long after Laura Ingalls Wilder began sharing the story of her family's journey through the open frontier. She shared her memories in a series of beloved Little House books that spanned a life of pioneering both before and after the government declared the frontier closed. She speaks in simple and intimate prose of everyday life that fascinated millions of young readers who wanted to live like Laura. Fans today still want to believe in the absolute truth of every word. 

C-Span

Senator Richard Blumenthal has called on the Republican leadership of the Senate Judiciary Committee to delay the planned vote on Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court.  Chairman Chuck Grassley has said the vote will take place at 9:30 am Friday.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Republican Bob Stefanowski, Democrat Ned Lamont, and third-party candidate Oz Griebel participated in a three-way gubernatorial debate Wednesday in front of students at the University of Connecticut.

Max Moran / Connecticut Public Radio

The firestorm in Washington, D.C., over the sexual misconduct charges leveled against U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is tearing its way through New Haven too.

Both Kavanaugh and his latest accuser, Deborah Ramirez, attended Yale together in the 1980s. As Ramirez tells it, the lecherous behavior came during a dorm party at the university and was fueled by heavy drinking. 

Eric Draper / Wikimedia Commons

The nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to fill the seat of departing Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy had already widened the chasm between Democrats and Republicans before allegations of sexual assault against Kavanaugh blew it wide open. 

C-SPAN

Christine Blasey Ford says she will testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee Thursday over allegations that U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her as a teenager.

Coming up, we wade through the details of the case and get reaction to reports of new allegations against Kavanaugh by a former Yale classmate. 

Hernan Pinera / Flickr

How well do we really know the poor? As our nation's economy grows and the jobless rate decreases, are we increasingly ignoring their voices? Haven't we always ignored them?

Paul Sableman / Creative Commons

It’s been ten years since the Great Recession reared its ugly head, lurching the country into a state of economic crisis. 

This hour, we look back and ask: What effect did the downturn have on the American public? And how did it come to reshape perceptions of the so-called ‘American dream’?

We check in with a senior researcher at the Pew Research Center. We also sit down with experts in the fields of economics and sociology. And we want to hear from you.

Whether you’re an immigrant or a native-born citizen, what do the words American dream mean to you? Is the answer to that question more or less clear now than it was a decade ago? 

We were going to produce a show today on loneliness with British writer Olivia Laing. We still want to do that show with Olivia - but not today.

Instead, we decided to switch gears and talk with Olivia and other artists about the themes in Olivia's new novel because they mirror our own concerns: how to live life in this fast-moving world where the present is history in the blink of an eye and world leaders can end our world with one wrong tweet? How can we exist, create art, raise children, commit to a future in a world that could be ending?

Andrew Turner / Creative Commons

There's a mostly forgotten story by the mostly forgotten sci-fi writer, R.A. Lafferty. It's called, "What's The Name of That Town." We meet a team of scientists and an amusing sentiant computer examining clues that suggested something existed once upon a time and has now been erased.

It turns out to be the city of Chicago which has been obliterated in an accident so traumatic that the city's existence has been wiped from all records and from peoples actual memories.

Prior to Monday's debate, a supporter of Ned Lamont got into a heated exchange with a man holding a sign touting Bob Stefanowski.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

It may have been a battle on the big stage between Republican Bob Stefanowski and Democrat Ned Lamont in their second gubernatorial debate Monday, but the candidates weren’t the only ones going after one another.

Paul Manafort, left, walks into court with his lawyer Kevin Downing on April 4, 2018.
Victoria Pickering (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal said that a guilty plea entered by New Britain native Paul Manafort is bad news for President Donald Trump in the ongoing investigation of Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election. 

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