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Listen live on Thursday at 1:00 p.m.

How well do we really know the poor? As our nation's economy grows and the jobless rate decreases, are we increasingly ignoring their voices? Hasn't we always ignored them?

We were going to produce a show today on loneliness with British writer Olivia Laing. We still want to do that show with Olivia - but not today.

Instead, we decided to switch gears and talk with Olivia and other artists about the themes in Olivia's new novel because they mirror our own concerns: how to live life in this fast-moving world where the present is history in the blink of an eye and world leaders can end our world with one wrong tweet? How can we exist, create art, raise children, commit to a future in a world that could be ending?

Andrew Turner / Creative Commons

There's a mostly forgotten story by the mostly forgotten sci-fi writer, R.A. Lafferty. It's called, "What's The Name of That Town." We meet a team of scientists and an amusing sentiant computer examining clues that suggested something existed once upon a time and has now been erased.

It turns out to be the city of Chicago which has been obliterated in an accident so traumatic that the city's existence has been wiped from all records and from peoples actual memories.

Prior to Monday's debate, a supporter of Ned Lamont got into a heated exchange with a man holding a sign touting Bob Stefanowski.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

It may have been a battle on the big stage between Republican Bob Stefanowski and Democrat Ned Lamont in their second gubernatorial debate Monday, but the candidates weren’t the only ones going after one another.

Paul Manafort, left, walks into court with his lawyer Kevin Downing on April 4, 2018.
Victoria Pickering (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal said that a guilty plea entered by New Britain native Paul Manafort is bad news for President Donald Trump in the ongoing investigation of Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Actress Cynthia Nixon lost the Democratic gubernatorial primary in New York yesterday. Did she lose because of the kind of bagel she eats? Probably not. But from the Nose's point of view, what could really matter more than that?

And Vulture, last week -- "as the discourse rages on about whether or not political correctness is destroying comedy (spoiler alert: it isn't)" -- ran a piece on the jokes comedians regret. But here's the real question: Do we want comedians regretting their jokes, tasteless or not?

Finally: Aneesh Chaganty's directorial debut, Searching, is maybe the first movie told entirely from the point of view of all of our screens. And it's maybe the first mainstream Hollywood thriller with an Asian-American lead actor (and while Crazy Rich Asians is still near the top of the charts).

And here's the recipe that Taneisha endorsed: Milk Bar's Salted Chocolate Chip Cookies

Jonathan McNicol / Connecticut Public Radio

You may have heard that Bob Woodward has a new book out.

It was number one on Amazon... before it came out. It was into its seventh printing -- a million copies... before it came out. The president Twittered about it at least a dozen times... before it came out.

Well, now it's out.

This hour: a look at the phenomenon of Fear.

Norwalk Police

The campaign manager for an unaffiliated candidate for governor has been arrested for embezzling money from his former employer. Kyle Lyddy was arrested by Norwalk police on Monday. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Ben Davol, a political strategist and former Connecticut state chairman for John McCain’s first presidential run, died this weekend at the age of 58. 

James Boyes / Creative Commons

After Naomi Osaka won the first set against Serena Williams during Saturday's U.S. Open Women's Final, chair umpire Carlos Ramos gave Williams a warning for receiving help from her coach, Patrick Mouratoglou, who was sitting in the stands. She asked Ramos to take it back. She told him she doesn't cheat. Ramos didn't take it back. After that, it got ugly.

hobvias sudoneighm / flickr creative commons

Semiotics is the study of sign process, which is to say: it's the science of the search for meaning.

And then, part of the underlying premise of semiotics -- which just happens to be part of the underlying premise of The Colin McEnroe Show, itself -- is that there's meaning... everywhere.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Should she win the Fifth Congressional District race on Nov. 6, Jahana Hayes would no longer be the only black female from New England elected to Congress. Ayanna Pressley, who toppled 10-term U.S. Rep. Michael Capuano in Tuesday's Democratic primary in Massachusetts' 7th District race, would hold that claim too. Unlike for Hayes, there's no Republican opposing Pressley in the general election.

This week, we gauge what Pressley's victory, and other trends suggesting this will be a big year for female candidates, means for Connecticut.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It's now a three-way race for Connecticut governor, as business advocate Oz Griebel has made it on to the ballot as a petitioning candidate.

martymcpadden / Creative Commons

With climate change come looming questions about the future of Connecticut's shoreline. Among them: How will sea level rise and extreme weather events alter the shape of the state's coast? And what will happen to the residents -- the people and native species -- who live there?

Coming up, local experts join us to offer some insight and talk about the ways municipalities are planning for the challenges that lie ahead. 

Derek Bridges / Creative Commons

I didn't vote for U.S. Senator John McCain when he ran for president in 2000 and again in 2008. I was deeply angry with him in 2008 when I felt he capitulated to political pressure when choosing his running mate. I realize now that I felt angry because I expected more from him. In my mind, he was a man with integrity.

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