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The Justice Department is following through on an executive order to withhold as much as $4.1 billion in federal grants from so-called "sanctuary cities," generally defined as places where local law enforcement limit their cooperation with federal authorities on immigration enforcement.

Immigrant rights activists in Connecticut want communities to know that a federal Immigrations and Customs Enforcement agent dressed as a local police officer in Hartford earlier this month. That was confirmed by Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin this week.

Editor's Note: This story includes videos and descriptions of violent encounters between police and civilians, as well as language that may not be appropriate for all readers.

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A spokesman for the federal agency that oversees immigration enforcement said its agents will continue to refer to themselves as "police," even though Hartford cops and the city's mayor are asking them to stop.

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East Haven and Hartford are the only two Connecticut cities named in the first list issued by the federal government of jurisdictions that limit cooperation with immigration enforcement. But the governor’s office has called into question the credibility of the whole exercise. 

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Hartford city officials are criticizing the federal agency that's in charge of immigration enforcement because agents are referring to themselves as "police."

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The Connecticut General Assembly's Public Health Committee had some tough questions for the co-sponsors of a bill that would legalize recreational marijuana in Connecticut.

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The City of Hartford's police department is short on officers.  As one way to try and fix the problem,  the department is now opening a two-week application process just for city residents. 

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The New London public school system hopes to pass an emergency policy this week that will safeguard undocumented children on school campuses in the city. Meanwhile, hundreds of people turned out at a community forum organized by the school district Monday night. 

On Thursday morning, law enforcement entered the Oceti Sakowin camp to do a final sweep before officially shutting it down, ending a months-long protest against the completion of the nearby Dakota Access Pipeline.

The Oceti Sakowin camp was the largest of several temporary camps on the northern edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota. Protesters have been living on this land for months, in support of members of the Standing Rock Sioux.

The Department of Homeland Security issued new guidelines this week that call for hiring 15,000 additional Border Patrol agents and immigration officers. It also wants to greatly expand the number of unauthorized immigrants who are prioritized for deportation.

The ACLU of Connecticut wants a study on how police in cities and towns across the state are implementing the use of body cameras.

Executive Director David McGuire testified before Connecticut lawmakers this week about a bill that would ask for a study on how that money is being spent. He said that $10 million was bonded in 2015 for the purchase of body cameras but that municipalities have yet to take advantage of it.

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Reports of large scale, nationwide deportation raids are stoking fear in Massachusetts immigrant communities. Immigrants — both those with legal status and those living here illegally — are questioning exactly who is vulnerable for deportation. 

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A report analyzing nearly 1,000 fatal police shootings that happened in 2015 claims evidence of racial bias. Researchers hope the study will strengthen a call for a national database on police use of force.

Updated at 6:25 p.m. ET

Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested 680 people in raids across the U.S. last week, approximately three-fourths of whom had prior criminal convictions, according to Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly.

The convictions were for offenses "including, but not limited to, homicide, aggravated sexual abuse, sexual assault of a minor, lewd and lascivious acts with a child, indecent liberties with a minor, drug trafficking, battery, assault, DUI and weapons charges."

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