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Whether for sport or sustenance; by rifle or crossbow, hunting has long been a part of the human experience.

This hour, we look back on our relationship with hunting and consider what it means to hunt today.

Are you a hunter? We want to hear from you. 

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Today, we've booked no guests. It's Colin and your calls. 

Saturday's confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court was the anticlimatic coda to a nomination that has both riveted and more deeply divided our country.

Depending on your view, the Kavanaugh confirmation either endangers the legitimacy of the court or is a welcome culmination to a decades-long effort to capture a solid conservative majority on the high court.

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Like many Americans, our newsroom was glued to the eight or so hours of testimony by Dr. Christine Blasey-Ford and Judge Brett Kavanaugh during last week's Senate Judiciary Hearings, including the dramatic committee vote on Friday that led to a limited FBI investigation. 

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The nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to fill the seat of departing Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy had already widened the chasm between Democrats and Republicans before allegations of sexual assault against Kavanaugh blew it wide open. 

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Today, we have no guests. We want to hear from you. We canceled our previously planned show so we could dedicate the entire hour to understanding how you are feeling about the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the  Supreme Court.

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The National Council for Adoption has reported a decline in U.S. intercountry adoptions since the year 2004.

This hour, we discuss the factors driving this downward shift and consider how it compares to trends in the adoption of children born domestically.

We also hear from two Connecticut residents with unique adoption experiences -- one as an adoptive father, the other as an adopted son.

If you have an adoption story you wish to share, we want to hear from you, too.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

An investigation has found that seven former faculty members at the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville sexually abused students over a 23-year period.

Updated at 7:34 p.m. ET

After an initial focus on Paul Manafort's lavish spending, including on luxury suits and home landscaping, the former Trump campaign chairman's trial has now moved squarely into the heart of his alleged financial crimes

On Day 4 of the federal trial Friday in Alexandria, Va., jurors heard from two of Manafort's former tax accountants, Cindy Laporta and Philip Ayliff. Their testimony directly addressed the bank and tax fraud charges the government has brought against Manafort.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A Syracuse University study revealed that the Hartford Immigration Court on average sets the highest bonds in the nation for undocumented immigrants facing deportation proceedings. At $15,000, it’s twice the national average.

Cody R. Wilson/"@radomysisky" on Twitter

Connecticut has announced it’s joining a group of states suing the federal government over a settlement reached in June with a Texas group that wants to distribute blueprints to create untraceable guns by 3D printing.

Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET

President Trump lashed out at his former lawyer Michael Cohen on Wednesday after Cohen released a tape on which the two discuss buying the story of a woman who said she had an affair with Trump. His current lawyer denies that payment took place.

"What kind of lawyer would tape a client?" Trump asked in a Twitter post on Wednesday.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut is suing the federal government over Republican tax cuts. The $1.5 trillion cuts were signed by President Donald Trump in December and included a cap on federal deductions for state and local tax, or SALT.

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Sure, you’ve heard the words “midlife crisis.” It’s possible you’ve even used them... you know, to justify that flashy new car you purchased at age 50?

But what exactly is a midlife crisis? Is it truly a crisis? Or something else? This hour, we take a closer look with Jonathan Rauch, author of the new book The Happiness Curve

Plus: too old to work? We wade through some of the challenges preventing older career-seekers from landing new employment.

And finally: harassment in the workplace. What can a small-business employee do when a situation with a boss or colleague gets out of hand? We find out. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Immigration agents approached a Danbury man outside of a courthouse in that city last Friday. Samuel Cruz-Coctecon, an undocumented immigrant from Mexico, attempted to escape, but did so into oncoming traffic and was hit by a car and injured.

KatarzynaBialasiewicz/iStock / Thinkstock

This hour, we give an overview of the NAACP's newly-announced prison gerrymandering lawsuit against Connecticut. Why did the organization choose to target our state? And why now?

Plus, a breakdown of the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in the case of Janus v. AFSCME. What does the justices’ decision mean for the future of Connecticut’s public-sector unions?

But first, the timeline for legal recreational marijuana sales in Massachusetts remains a bit... hazy. We get the latest on the Bay State’s budding industry and find out what lies ahead for pot retailers. 

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