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Today, we've booked no guests. It's Colin and your calls. 

Saturday's confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court was the anticlimatic coda to a nomination that has both riveted and more deeply divided our country.

Depending on your view, the Kavanaugh confirmation either endangers the legitimacy of the court or is a welcome culmination to a decades-long effort to capture a solid conservative majority on the high court.

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The nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to fill the seat of departing Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy had already widened the chasm between Democrats and Republicans before allegations of sexual assault against Kavanaugh blew it wide open. 

Hernan Pinera / Flickr

How well do we really know the poor? As our nation's economy grows and the jobless rate decreases, are we increasingly ignoring their voices? Haven't we always ignored them?

Angela N / Creative Commons

Today, we have no guests. We want to hear from you. We canceled our previously planned show so we could dedicate the entire hour to understanding how you are feeling about the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the  Supreme Court.

Paolo Zialcita / Connecticut Public Radio

Salma Sikandar, a Bangladeshi mother, faces deportation after overstaying her visa. Connecticut residents rallied at Hartford’s Immigration Court to show their support for the family. Several public officials, including Governor Dannel Malloy and Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin, were also in attendance.

CT-N

Senator Richard Blumenthal has introduced a resolution in the Senate calling on the government to declassify and release documents related to 9/11. Families of the victims of the massacre believe the documents will show the true extent of the government investigation into the hijackers’ ties to sponsors in Saudi Arabia.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Two Central American migrant children sent to Connecticut after being separated from their parents at the border have been reunited with their parents and the families released into the community.

Updated at 7:51 p.m. ET

A Justice Department watchdog on Thursday criticized former FBI Director James Comey for violating long-standing department guidelines and mishandling the Hillary Clinton email investigation in 2016.

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

A new movie revisits the battle behind Kelo v. City of New London. We’ll take a look back at this eminent domain case that unfolded right here in Connecticut.

Governor Dannel Malloy / Creative Commons

A little over a week after his first pick for chief justice of the state Supreme Court was turned down by the state senate, Governor Dannel Malloy announced his new choice Thursday.

Joe Gratz / flickr creative commons

For an American Sign Language-interpreted version click here.

Since 1989, more than 2,000 people have been identified as victims of wrongful convictions in the U.S. In 2015 and 2016, the wrongfully convicted were exonerated at a rate of about three per week.

This hour, a look at the reality of, psychology behind, and institutionalized pressures toward wrongful convictions in America.

Library of Congress

This hour: As Women's History Month draws to a close, we draw attention to a Connecticut native who was integral in the campaign for civil rights -- Judge Constance Baker Motley.

Coming up, we take an in-depth look at Judge Motley's life and talk about her legacy both inside and outside of the courtroom.

Plus: Suzan-Lori Parks’ Father Comes Home From the Wars Parts 1, 2 & 3 opened at Yale Repertory Theatre earlier this month.

We learn more about the production and find out how the Theatre’s ongoing WILL POWER! initiative is exposing students to the arts. 

Gov. Malloy outlines juvenile justice proposals. Behind him, left to right, University of New Haven President Steven Kaplan, Commissioner Scott Semple, Sheriff Steven Tompkins, and Connecticut Juvenile Justice Alliance Executive Director Abby Anderson.
Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

Governor Dannel Malloy has sponsored two bills aimed at increasing protections for low-risk, young adults in the criminal justice system.

Mike Dunphy.

She grew up knowing more about "farming than feminism." Now she serves as leader of the oldest women's foundation in the country. 

This hour: a conversation with Teresa Younger, President and CEO of the Ms. Foundation for Women.

It's the fourth installment in Connecticut Public Radio's “Making Her Story” series highlighting prominent women with ties to Connecticut. 

Library of Congress

This hour: As Black History Month draws to a close, we draw attention to a Connecticut native who was integral in the campaign for civil rights -- Judge Constance Baker Motley.

Coming up, we take an in-depth look at Judge Motley's life and talk about her legacy both inside and outside of the courtroom.

Plus: Suzan-Lori Parks’ Father Comes Home From the Wars Parts 1, 2 & 3 opens at Yale Repertory Theatre next month.

We learn more about the production and find out how the Theatre’s ongoing WILL POWER! initiative is exposing students to the arts. 

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