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infrastructure

Ervins Strauhmanis / Creative Commons

Three Merrimack Valley, Massachusetts neighborhoods were marred by natural gas explosions Thursday, in an incident that left one dead and several others injured. This hour, we take an in-depth look at what happened and consider the likelihood that a similar situation could unfold here in Connecticut.

Later, we learn why some local residents and advocates are airing their grievances against Veyo, the company contracted to provide non-emergency transportation to adults and children on Medicaid. How did the California-based enterprise come to operate in Connecticut in the first place? We find out.

And finally, we wade through the known and unknown effects of e-cigarette use, and find out why the electronic tobacco devices are so fashionable among youths today. Have you owned or smoked an e-cigarette? What about your child or children? We want to hear from you. 

David Siu / Creative Commons

Nobody likes the termite. They get into the wood in our homes that can lead to infuriating and expensive repairs. What's to like.

It turns out, there's a lot to like about the termite; scientists study how termites build their "mounds" for clues to solving some of the world's most pressing problems, like mitigating the effects of drought, building colonies on Mars, and the creation of biofuels. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

A dreaded part of Interstate 84 running through Waterbury, which is notorious for bottlenecks and traffic jams, enters a new, bigger, chapter this week.

Updated at 5 a.m. ET on Wednesday

A long section of the towering Ponte Morandi Bridge completely collapsed in Genoa, Italy, on Tuesday, sending cars and trucks on the A10 highway crashing down below. Dozens of people died in the bridge failure, officials say.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The state bond commission approved funding for a $10 million study of road tolls Wednesday.

WBZ-TV

Rhode Island’s new toll program made more than half a million dollars in one month.  But only tolling tractor-trailers has led to a lawsuit by the trucking industry not to mention criticisms from some Rhode Island politicians.  

RMS Companies

The city of Hartford has selected RMS Companies to develop 32 properties surrounding Dunkin’ Donuts Park near the intersection of Albany Avenue and Main Street  -- an area known as “Downtown North.”

There's more rain falling on some parts of the U.S. than there used to be, and many towns just aren't ready for the flooding that follows.

Ellicott City, Md., is one such community. Nestled in a valley west of Baltimore, the town was founded in 1772, and some Revolutionary War-era buildings still house businesses along the narrow main street in historic downtown. It also sits at the confluence of three streams.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The Walk Bridge is a century-old “swing bridge” in Norwalk that carries hundreds of trains each day along Connecticut’s southern coast.

Rendering of Hartford Sports Group's proposed renovations to Dillon Stadium.
Hartford Sports Group

Hartford City Council approved a state-bonded $10 million renovation of the historic Dillon Stadium Monday night.

Office of Governor Dan Malloy / Screenshot via YouTube

While police have identified the six people killed when a new pedestrian bridge in Miami collapsed last week, officials are still investigating what caused the tragedy.

Connecticut Department of Transportation Commissioner James Redeker
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Two months after the state Department of Transportation halted more than 400 road projects in Connecticut because of budget issues, there’s still no resolution in sight.

Connecticut Department of Transportation Commissioner James Redeker
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut's transportation system is facing some problems. Weathered infrastructure, scant funds, an inert legislature -- can these hurdles ever be cleared?

This hour, James Redeker, Commissioner of the Department of Transportation, joins us. We take an in-depth look at the state's ongoing transit issues and talk about solutions.

Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro speaking at Blakeslee Arpaia Chapman General contractor in Branford, Connecticut.
Lori Mack / WNPR

President Trump recently announced his infrastructure plan to fix the nation’s highways, bridges, and transit - a $1.5 to $1.7 trillion investment. And while lawmakers on both sides of the aisle support infrastructure legislation, most states, including Connecticut, are disappointed in the funding formula.

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

Senator Richard Blumenthal said Monday in Hartford that he is against President Donald Trump’s proposed $1.5 trillion plan to repair America’s infrastructure because it forces local governments to come up with the money.

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