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immigration

Lori Mack / CT Public Radio

A coalition of New Haven high school and college students staged a walkout Thursday in support of Nelson Pinos. He’s the Ecuadorian husband and father of three who took sanctuary in a city church nearly a year ago to avoid deportation.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Sitting in his tidy apartment in Bridgeport, Jose Zabala, 38, described crossing the U.S. border in 2001 when a major earthquake hit El Salvador. The disaster allowed him to receive legal protection known as Temporary Protected Status or TPS.

Two Central American children who were taken from their parents at the U.S. border will get legal immigration status for a year, under an unusual settlement with the government.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A New Haven woman is scheduled to be deported to her native Bangladesh this Thursday. On Tuesday, she made it to Hartford for her final check-in with immigration officials.

Connecticut Network

Lawmakers, immigration advocates and doctors are urging Immigration and Custom Enforcement Officials to stop the deportation of New London resident Julian Rodriguez. Rodriguez's 14 year-old son Santi has a rare genetic condition called Chronic Granulomatous Disease, or CGD, which requires regular treatment at Connecticut Children's Medical Center.

Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal calls this deportation case unique because Santi and his mother are participants in a research study at the National Institutes of Health that could lead to a cure for CGD.

Paolo Zialcita / Connecticut Public Radio

Salma Sikandar, a Bangladeshi mother, faces deportation after overstaying her visa. Connecticut residents rallied at Hartford’s Immigration Court to show their support for the family. Several public officials, including Governor Dannel Malloy and Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin, were also in attendance.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A Syracuse University study revealed that the Hartford Immigration Court on average sets the highest bonds in the nation for undocumented immigrants facing deportation proceedings. At $15,000, it’s twice the national average.

The Trump administration has told a federal judge that it has reunited more than 1,000 parents with their children after the families were separated at the U.S.-Mexico border, but it has lost track of hundreds more parents.

The data, submitted in a court hearing on Tuesday, suggests that, by the government's accounting, it will largely meet a second deadline imposed by the judge to bring eligible immigrant families back together.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Local advocates for migrant children separated from their parents at the United States border said Monday that they don’t believe the Trump administration will meet a court-ordered deadline to bring the families together. The deadline imposed by a U.S. district court in California is July 26.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

Migrants detained in recent months at the U.S.-Mexico border describe being held in Customs and Border Protection facilities that are unsanitary and overcrowded, receiving largely inedible food and being forced to drink foul-smelling drinking water.

Documents filed Monday in U.S. District Court in California and viewed by NPR late Tuesday contain interviews with some 200 individuals detained under the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy, many of whom related poor conditions at the centers.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Two Central American migrant children sent to Connecticut after being separated from their parents at the border have been reunited with their parents and the families released into the community.

Paolo Zialcita / Connecticut Public Radio

A federal judge in Bridgeport has ruled that the Trump administration violated the constitutional rights of two Central American migrant children when federal authorities took them at the Texas border and sent them to Connecticut without their parents. 

Zairys Maysonet

Over 30 Jewish, Muslim, and Christian teenagers came together on the New Haven Green Tuesday to paint a 48-foot sign welcoming refugees. 

A Harvard brain scientist who studies trauma in children is warning of lasting damage to the young migrants who've been separated from their parents at the border.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Immigration agents approached a Danbury man outside of a courthouse in that city last Friday. Samuel Cruz-Coctecon, an undocumented immigrant from Mexico, attempted to escape, but did so into oncoming traffic and was hit by a car and injured.

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