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human rights

Staff Sgt. James L. Harper Jr. / US Air Force

From veterans returning from Iraq, to survivors of mass shootings, to those putting together the pieces after a hurricane--we know that the emotional and psychological scars of violence and tragedies sometimes last even longer than physical wounds.

But what is the psychological toll on those who help victims of traumatic experiences?

Pedro Encina / Flickr

This week marks the 45th anniversary of a coup in Chile that overthrew the democratically elected president Salvador Allende and radically changed the course of Chilean history.

Carmen Baskauf / WNPR

Adriana Falcón Trafford is a West Hartford resident who came to Connecticut from Chile in 1974 to escape the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet. This week marks the 45-year anniversary of the military coup in which brought Pinochet to power.  Connecticut Public Radio's Where We Live reflected on the events and what they meant for Chile and for the world. 

Matthew Straubmuller / Creative Commons

 

Many of us hoped the white nationalist movement that instigated last year's "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, would suffer a fatal blow. The majority of Americans condemned both the blatant bigotry displayed by the protesters and the president's failure to single out the nationalists as the perpetrators of the "hatred, bigotry and violence." He instead, said he saw that violence "on many sides."

That's not what happened.

The Misperception Of Disability

Aug 10, 2018
Gavin Clarke / Flickr

In the summer of 2018, the Colin McEnroe Show and the entire talk show team at WNPR had the honor in selecting Jason Perez for an internship at Connecticut Public Radio. Perez worked with Colin McEnroe Show senior producer Betsy Kaplan to produce an episode, aired August 8, that focused on what the general public typically gets wrong about people who have a disability. Along with guests Lila Call and Maysoon Zayid, the three opened up and discussed their lives living with their respective disabilities and how they’re often mistreated.

What We Get Wrong About Disability

Aug 8, 2018
Vantage Point Veteran Affairs / Google Images

When was the last time you saw someone with a disability? Do you have a loved one who is part of the community? Did you see a character on TV, or did you just pass someone on the street? For some it may take a while to answer that question. Why is that?

David Goehring / Creative Commons

Today, we have no guests. Just a conversation between you and Colin about Stephanie Wilkinson's request that Sarah Huckabee Sanders leave the Red Hen restaurant Friday night. Wilkinson owns the Red Hen, where Sanders and her party were dining Friday night.

Chelsea Southard / Creative Commons

Old asylums give us the creeps. The reality of asylums may pale in comparison to the horrors we conjure in our minds. Yet, they were awful. They were dark and dirty and overcrowded. Diseases were rampant and deadly. Staff was abusive. Food was scarce and inedible. Death and suicide were common.

So, why does President Trump want to bring them back? 

Saud Anwar

The military of Myanmar has been carrying out a campaign of ethnic cleansing against Rohingya Muslims. This hour we talk with a Connecticut delegation who just returned from a humanitarian mission to a refugee camp in neighboring Bangladesh and a political science researcher studying the crisis. What is the role of the U.S. as this massive humanitarian disaster unfolds?

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

On a national “Day of Empathy” for those in the criminal justice system, Governor Dannel Malloy proposed a law to recognize the unique needs of women in prison.

trialsanderrors / flickr

Few things evoke such antipathy and condemnation from the western world than the idea of children toiling away for low pay in dangerous conditions. And while there are cases of child labor which truly warrant our concern, the broader truth is a bit more complicated.

Mansour Omari had been held nearly a year in an underground Syrian prison, tortured and starved, when his name was called by the guards. He was going to be released. The other prisoners hugged him and wept. In the dark, they whispered, "Don't forget us."

Omari would not forget. When he was eventually set free in 2013, he smuggled out the names of all 82 inmates. The lists were written on torn pieces of clothing and penned in blood, then sewn into the collar and cuffs of his shirt. It was his duty, he says, to make sure the names saw the light of day.

Diane Sobolewski / www.goodspeed.org

From his work on Wicked, to Pippin, to Godspell, to The Magic Show and more, few people have had such a hand in shaping the music of Broadway theater as Stephen Schwartz.

Curt Richter, Chion Wolf / WNPR

Colin McEnroe is taking a couple weeks off, so today Chion Wolf introduces you to three Connecticut residents who have careers in very different fields of expertise.

Fibonacci Blue / Creative Commons

Cultural leaders are beating a hasty retreat from President Trump. 

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