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Brett Kavanaugh is not the first presidential nominee to have his run to the Supreme Court frozen at the finish line by a woman's accusations.

Throughout this week of turmoil in Washington, the historical backstory has been the 1991 confrontation between Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas and a former colleague named Anita Hill.

NASA

The country watched Hurricane Florence pummel communities across the Carolinas this week, leaving flooding, destruction, and death in its path.

This hour we ask New York Times climate reporter Kendra Pierre-Louis--is climate change causing these devastating storms to become more common?

Andrew Turner / Creative Commons

There's a mostly forgotten story by the mostly forgotten sci-fi writer, R.A. Lafferty. It's called, "What's The Name of That Town." We meet a team of scientists and an amusing sentiant computer examining clues that suggested something existed once upon a time and has now been erased.

It turns out to be the city of Chicago which has been obliterated in an accident so traumatic that the city's existence has been wiped from all records and from peoples actual memories.

Pedro Encina / Flickr

This week marks the 45th anniversary of a coup in Chile that overthrew the democratically elected president Salvador Allende and radically changed the course of Chilean history.

Carmen Baskauf / WNPR

Adriana Falcón Trafford is a West Hartford resident who came to Connecticut from Chile in 1974 to escape the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet. This week marks the 45-year anniversary of the military coup in which brought Pinochet to power.  Connecticut Public Radio's Where We Live reflected on the events and what they meant for Chile and for the world. 

Ray Hardman / Connecticut Public Radio

A new exhibit at the New Britain Museum of American Art celebrates the history of the Farmington arts scene, a little known but influential chapter in American art.

On Sept. 11th, 2001, Joe Dittmar was on the 105th floor of the World Trade Center's South Tower for a business meeting when the terrorist attacks started.

Dittmar, then 44, had been visiting New York City from Aurora, Ill., a Chicago suburb, where he worked in the insurance industry.

Before the meeting began, the first plane hit the North Tower, and Dittmar saw the hellish aftermath from a South Tower window.

hobvias sudoneighm / flickr creative commons

Semiotics is the study of sign process, which is to say: it's the science of the search for meaning.

And then, part of the underlying premise of semiotics -- which just happens to be part of the underlying premise of The Colin McEnroe Show, itself -- is that there's meaning... everywhere.

Rogelio A. Galaviz C. / Flickr

It’s difficult to imagine children’s programming without the impact of Fred Rogers. For nearly 50 years, Rogers pioneered a model for how children can learn, discover themselves and grow by watching tailor-made programs. Now, 15 years after his death, his legacy continues thanks to a documentary, an upcoming film, and now a new biography that chronicles his life.

Eleanor Roosevelt (second from left) and Lorena Hickok (far right)
Franklin D. Roosevelt Library / Wikimedia Commons

Eleanor Roosevelt was a woman with a huge historical footprint -- First Lady, first U.S. delegate to the United Nations General Assembly. She was dubbed “The First Lady of the World” by Harry Truman. 

But how much is known about Eleanor’s personal life beyond the politics and activism? This hour, we sit down with Connecticut author Amy Bloom. Her new book, White Houses, is a fictional novel that explores Roosevelt’s real-life romantic relationship with female journalist Lorena Hickok.

Dave White / Creative Commons

For interview highlights from this show, click here. 

It’s been fifteen years since the death of Fred Rogers -- a man who, for decades, served as the cardigan-donning host and creator of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.

Rogers’ life is now the focus of a new Maxwell King biography -- aptly titled The Good Neighbor. This hour, we sit down with King for a special preview of the book. 

Amherst College announced it's changing the name of the Lord Jeffrey Inn, a landmark hotel on campus.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

One of the things you will learn this hour is how close New Haven came to being a possession of Spain. Even if you think you know the story of the New Haven Regicides, the men who fled to the New World rather than face punishment, by which I mean death, for their complicity in the execution of Charles I, we probably have some surprises for you.  

By we, I mean Lord Charles Spencer, who joins me in studio to talk about his book, Killers of the King. Spencer writes a very brisk and compelling style of history. To put it another way, if you like "Game of Thrones," it's a pretty easy leap from there to this story. 

Ray Hardman / Connecticut Public Radio

Gene Pitney's career as a singer, songwriter and producer took him around the world, but always returned to his hometown, Rockville, now part of Vernon, Connecticut. His nickname, after all, was the "Rockville Rocket."

Treasures from Gene Pitney's personal archives are now on display an exhibit at Arts Center East in the Rockville section of Vernon.

Christel Øverland Preteni / flickr creative commons

humor = tragedy + time

Okay, but then the logical next question is: How much time?

If it's okay, at this point, to joke about, say, The Spanish Inquisition... what about, for instance, the Holocaust? Or AIDS? September 11th? The #MeToo movement?

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