WNPR

Health Equity and Access Project

UW Health / Creative Commons

The rate of people without health insurance in rural Connecticut has gone down dramatically since the passage of the Affordable Care Act.

That’s the takeaway message from a new report on health insurance out of Georgetown University’s Center for Children and Families. Edwin Park, a research professor at the center, said the key to the drop is the state’s expansion of Medicaid to include more people.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut is receiving a $10 million grant that will be used to increase access to care for people with substance abuse and mental health disorders.

Lisa Wilson (top right) with her family in Hartford, Connecticut. Her son was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

A growing body of research indicates that there are disparities based on race and ethnicity in health care overall. This is also true in the field of autism.

Feverpitched / Thinkstock

New federal data find that about one in 59 children has autism spectrum disorder.

National Cancer Institute

Health care advocates say Connecticut needs to do a better job examining just how a person’s race can affect their health and their recovery from disease.

UW Health / Creative Commons

Kerry Taylor and her husband are self-employed farmers from Salem. She said her family has to consider health insurance costs when balancing the annual business budget.

SUDOK1/ISTOCK / THINKSTOCK

Congress blew past a September 30 deadline to reauthorize federal funding for about 1,200 community health centers nationwide. The funding lapse is already having an impact in Connecticut.

woodleywonderworks/flickr creative commons

A lot more attention has been paid in recent years to addressing the needs of kids with severe developmental delays and diagnoses like autism. But a new study finds that we're not offering the best help to kids who may have more moderate needs.

Ken Cedeno / International Medical Corps

People displaced by the disaster in Puerto Rico face multiple problems - finding housing, getting kids settled in schools, adjusting to a new climate. And all of those can be intensified if they’re also dealing with health issues.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

When we met Dr. Bolivar Arboleda Osorio in the city of Caguas a few weeks back, he talked about his experience treating patients in the aftermath of the storm -- first came the trauma victims, then came the chronic and severe cases that were becoming emergencies as time dragged on and the lights stayed off. Electronic records were stuck in the cloud. Patients, not able to call for an appointment, just showed up.

DoNotLick

Connecticut’s recently passed biennial budget made drastic changes to health care provisions for some state residents. One of the ways lawmakers saved money was by cutting back Medicaid eligibility. 

sudok1/iStock / Thinkstock

People living in Connecticut’s rural areas are dying at a higher rate than the state average. New data just released by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that in the 68 towns designated as rural, death rates from major killers, such as cancer and heart disease, are all higher. 

Spotmatik/iStock / Thinkstock

Health insurance for thousands of children in Connecticut could soon disappear.

That’s because Congress failed to meet a September 30th deadline to renew funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program, or CHIP.

flash.pro / Creative Commons

The mass shooting in Las Vegas is dominating the media news cycle. Since the tragedy Sunday night, TV news and social media have displayed a continuous stream of images and video of the chaotic scene at the Highway 91 Harvest Festival that left at least 59 dead.

iStock

The rate of infants dying suddenly and unexpectedly has dropped in recent years, but data show that racial disparities persist.

Pages