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guns

Jiří Nedorost / Creative Commons

Whether for sport or sustenance; by rifle or crossbow, hunting has long been a part of the human experience.

This hour, we look back on our relationship with hunting and consider what it means to hunt today.

Are you a hunter? We want to hear from you. 

GEORGE FREY / GETTY IMAGES

Bump stocks are now banned in Connecticut. That’s the attachment that makes a semi-automatic weapon fire nearly as fast as a fully-automatic machine gun.

Experienced gun hobbyists recognized the sound right away.

"I knew for a fact it was a bump stock as soon as I heard the video," says Jeff LaCroix. He's a recreational shooter in Louisiana. He says the rapid, uneven sound of the gunfire at the Route 91 Harvest music festival in Las Vegas last Oct. 1 made it clear to him a bump stock was involved.

Courtesy: Matt McDermott

American Outdoor Brands Corporation, the gun company formerly known as Smith & Wesson, held its annual shareholders’ meeting Tuesday. The meeting was webcast, but in Hamden and Bridgeport, a group of unusual shareholders met at local houses of worship to listen. These shareholders are shaking things up.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

With school in session and safety top of mind for parents, students, teachers and politicians, U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) is demanding clarity and accountability from U.S. Department of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. 

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During halftime of tonight's football game between the University of Connecticut and the University of Central Florida, UConn’s marching band will pay special tribute to a student killed in the February shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. Alex Schachter, 14, had plans to apply to UConn and play trombone in the marching band.

Vanessa de la Torre / WNPR

Students from Parkland, Florida travelled to Newtown Connecticut—the site of the Sandy Hook massacre—to rally against gun violence this weekend.  But the problem of gun violence is not just confined to mass shootings.

Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

In this last week before the August 14 party primaries, the debates, and endorsements--not to mention those tree-killing mailers clogging our post office boxes--are coming fast and furious.

Here's a sample of the questions we're contemplating at this critical stage:

Justin Pickard (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Local gun advocates are speaking out against an attempt by lawmakers to stop a Texas group from releasing downloadable blueprints for 3D-printing guns. 

NotLessOrEqual (Wikimedia) / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s U.S. senators are co-sponsoring legislation to block the availability of downloadable blueprints for the creation of plastic guns. A temporary injunction is currently preventing access to the blueprints, which a Texas group, Defense Distributed, wants to make available.

Alyssa Hurlbut / CTMirror.org

Haddam has been at the center of an uproar ever since Selectwoman Melissa Schlag knelt during the Pledge of Allegiance at a town meeting. For Schlag, it was a way of demonstrating her disapproval of President Donald Trump and his administration's policies. For others, it was an insult to the American flag.

U.S. Senate Democrats

A federal judge has issued an injunction temporarily halting the distribution of blueprints to build plastic guns with 3D printers. The ruling came in a case argued by Connecticut and seven other states. Success in court followed the failure of a bill introduced by Democrats in the U.S. Senate to try to block the release of blueprints that demonstrate how to produce the untraceable weapons. 

Cody R. Wilson/"@radomysisky" on Twitter

Connecticut has announced it’s joining a group of states suing the federal government over a settlement reached in June with a Texas group that wants to distribute blueprints to create untraceable guns by 3D printing.

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

The Region 10 School District in Burlington recently informed parents their plans to train and arm security guards for the upcoming school year. But many other schools in the state take a different approach to student safety.

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

Public safety concerns in a portion of New Haven have led to a duck hunting ban. The Department of Energy and Environmental Protection announced that they’ve closed the area along the Quinnipiac River in New Haven to hunting for one year. During that time, DEEP will conduct a study and make a recommendation. 

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