WNPR

government

Donkey Hotey / Creative Commons

  

Newt Gingrich and Bill Clinton were using strategies to deliberately divide America's political system decades before the pivotal 2000 presidential election between Al Gore and George W. Bush divided us into gangs of  'red' or 'blue.'

Eric Draper / Wikimedia Commons

Like many Americans, our newsroom was glued to the eight or so hours of testimony by Dr. Christine Blasey-Ford and Judge Brett Kavanaugh during last week's Senate Judiciary Hearings, including the dramatic committee vote on Friday that led to a limited FBI investigation. 

Senate Judiciary Committee

Dr. Christine Blasey Ford’s account of what she said Judge Brett Kavanaugh did to her in the early 1980s acted as a trigger for many of the millions who watched on television. It’s forcing survivors to relive abuse they’ve suffered.

Hernan Pinera / Flickr

How well do we really know the poor? As our nation's economy grows and the jobless rate decreases, are we increasingly ignoring their voices? Haven't we always ignored them?

Andrew Turner / Creative Commons

There's a mostly forgotten story by the mostly forgotten sci-fi writer, R.A. Lafferty. It's called, "What's The Name of That Town." We meet a team of scientists and an amusing sentiant computer examining clues that suggested something existed once upon a time and has now been erased.

It turns out to be the city of Chicago which has been obliterated in an accident so traumatic that the city's existence has been wiped from all records and from peoples actual memories.

Angela N / Creative Commons

Today, we have no guests. We want to hear from you. We canceled our previously planned show so we could dedicate the entire hour to understanding how you are feeling about the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the  Supreme Court.

Carmen Baskauf / WNPR

Adriana Falcón Trafford is a West Hartford resident who came to Connecticut from Chile in 1974 to escape the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet. This week marks the 45-year anniversary of the military coup in which brought Pinochet to power.  Connecticut Public Radio's Where We Live reflected on the events and what they meant for Chile and for the world. 

James Boyes / Creative Commons

After Naomi Osaka won the first set against Serena Williams during Saturday's U.S. Open Women's Final, chair umpire Carlos Ramos gave Williams a warning for receiving help from her coach, Patrick Mouratoglou, who was sitting in the stands. She asked Ramos to take it back. She told him she doesn't cheat. Ramos didn't take it back. After that, it got ugly.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A New Haven woman is scheduled to be deported to her native Bangladesh this Thursday. On Tuesday, she made it to Hartford for her final check-in with immigration officials.

The Battle For Butter

Aug 20, 2018
Robert S. Donovan/flickr creative commons

We tend not to think much about that pat of butter we put on our morning toast, including how the store-bought sweet cream butter we're eating likely pales in comparison to the rich, nutty flavor of  the cultured butter not found in many stores.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

It didn’t take long for the gloves to come off in the race to be Connecticut’s next governor.

Ryohei Noda / Creative Commons

Hannah Arendt's 576-page magnum opus, The Origins of Totalitarianism, is a densely-written book about the rise of anti-Semitism up to the outbreak of World War I. The book sold out on Amazon within one month of the 2016 election in which America elected Donald Trump as their next president. 

Jesus Garzon / Connecticut Public Radio

Every Democratic member of the Senate Judiciary Committee has joined in making a Freedom of Information Act request for records related to the career of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. 

R. NIal Bradshaw / Creative Commons

The Washington Post, in The Fact Checker database they've kept since the 2016 electionnotes an increase in the number of false or misleading claims the president has made in recent months while traveling the country to campaign for Republicans running in summer primaries.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut experienced an increase in new voter registration after the 2016 presidential election.

The secretary of the state’s office is reporting that 275,114 new voters registered between the between November 2016 and July 2018, an increase over data collected 20 months out from the 2014 mid-term election.

Pages