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finance

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Tax-exempt property and the impending departure of Aetna are two issues weighing heavily on Hartford as the capital city manages a fiscal crisis. 

Ksenia Andreeva / Creative Commons

Hartford is inching closer and closer to insolvency — at a time when Connecticut is facing a fiscal crisis of its own.

This hour, we talk about the B word. Without the state to lean on, could Hartford file for bankruptcy?

Dru Bloomfield / Creative Commons

More young adults live in their parents’ homes today than in 1940. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, roughly 34 percent of the nation’s millennials live in their childhood bedrooms or their parent’s basements. 

Brett Hondow / Creative Commons

One of the major ratings agencies has downgraded Connecticut’s general obligation bonds, making it more expensive for the state to borrow money. Fitch Ratings downgraded the state from A+ to AA-. 

Connecticut must decide whether to continue with a project to help private sector workers save for retirement, after the U.S. Senate scrapped a rule supporting the plan. Republican senators voted to remove an Obama-era guideline that helped states to administer retirement plans for workers whose employers don't offer the benefit.

NY State IPM Program at Cornell University / Creative Commons

The tick population in Connecticut is on the rise, and so is the threat of Lyme disease — and other tick-borne illnesses.

This hour, we hear the latest from medical professionals and policy makers about the need for new funding and research to battle a “growing tick problem” in the Northeast.

The city of Miami can sue Wells Fargo and Bank of America for damages under the Fair Housing Act, the Supreme Court says, allowing a lawsuit to continue that accuses the big banks of causing economic harm with discriminatory and predatory lending practices.

The 5-3 vote saw Chief Justice John Roberts form a majority with the court's more liberal justices. Justice Anthony Kennedy, widely seen as the court's "swing" justice, sided with Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito. The court's newest justice, Neil Gorsuch, wasn't involved in the case.

Jim Bowen / Creative Commons

State lawmakers are up against deadlines this week to settle on a budget plan — one that tackles a nearly two billion dollar deficit next year. But so far all we’ve seen is a logjam in Hartford.

This hour, we find out what gridlock at the capitol could mean for the state’s future.

Rep. Joe Aresimowicz

A key legislative committee has withdrawn a budget proposal which Democrats had hoped to vote through Tuesday. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut U.S. Marine Michael Zacchea had a job to do in 2004: train and lead the first Iraqi Army battalion after the U.S. disbanded the country’s military post invasion.

This hour, we revisit our conversation with Zacchea, and co-author Ted Kemp about their book The Ragged Edge which details the challenges Zacchea faced leading a diverse group of Iraqis. 

Basheer Tome / Creative Commons

A plan to consolidate operations within Connecticut’s State Colleges and Universities system — to save millions — has roiled staff and raised questions about how well the schools can respond to the needs of students in their communities.

This hour, we talk about the Board of Regents decision and we want to hear from you.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

After a presentation from the president of the Connecticut State Colleges and Universities, the Board of Regents for Higher Education adopted the framework of a plan for sweeping administrative consolidations on Thursday.

Imagine if one notice from the federal government could cause you to question your major life decisions.

More than half a million people may have found themselves in that situation after a new legal filing by the Education Department.

Under a program known as Public Service Loan Forgiveness, some student loan borrowers were supposed to be able to have the balance of their student loans forgiven after ten years of both on-time payments and eligible work in the public sector. Meaning, a qualifying nonprofit, federal, local, state, or tribal government.

Dru Bloomfield / Creative Commons

More young adults live in their parents’ homes today than in 1940. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, roughly 34 percent of the nation’s millennials live in their childhood bedrooms or their parent’s basements. 

When it comes to fiscal crises, Connecticut is not alone. A new study shows two thirds of states nationwide are also facing budget shortfalls this year or next, and its authors say they need to think differently about their finances. 

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