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finance

Updated at 6:15 p.m. ET

President Trump asked his attorney general to stop Robert Mueller's special counsel investigation Wednesday morning, as the first trial stemming from that investigation entered its second day.

Paul Manafort, Trump's former campaign chairman, is on trial in Alexandria, Va., for bank and tax fraud charges, not, as Trump noted in a Twitter thread Wednesday morning, for "collusion."

c-George/iStock / Thinkstock

Whether you’re young or old(er), has retirement planning got you swimming in a sea of dollar signs and question marks? Have no fear!

This hour, we look at best practices to help keep your head above water and make the most of your financial future. 401(k)s, Roth IRAs… we check in with a certified financial planner and take your calls, tweets, and emails.

Plus: learning to save at an early age. We hear how a series of local “reality fairs” is teaching Connecticut’s high school students the value of financial literacy. 

Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

Connecticut State Capitol
Jim Bowen / Creative Commons

Lawmakers heard arguments Monday against what critics say will be a disastrous new system of fiscal restraint in Connecticut. As the law stands now, bonds issued by the state from the middle of next month will include a guarantee to the bondholder - a so-called bond lock. 

Creative Commons

Connecticut is among the worst states in the country when it comes to being financially literate, according to a recent report by Champlain College.

jglazer75 / Wikimedia Commons

Connecticut finally has a budget.  

After nearly four months of gridlock amidst a growing fiscal crisis--the CT General Assembly last Thursday passed a bipartisan budget.

401k(2012) / Flickr

As our society moves further away from paper currency, we pause to look back at the once predominant form of payment. Its look, its feel and its smell all hold a place in the collective consciousness of our nation's history.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The future of Connecticut’s only nuclear power plant is again in question. State officials are ordering a months-long review of the Millstone Power Station’s finances, while the station’s owner is indicating it may still decide to close the plant without immediate legislative support.

Remember Rhode Island’s disastrous deal with former Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling? The state invested $75 million of taxpayer dollars in Schilling’s video game company 38 Studios and lost it all before a lawsuit clawed back most of the money. It was one of the worst financial decisions in Rhode Island history. Yet the company that served as the state’s financial adviser on the deal has continued doing business throughout the state.

Mamata.mulay / Creative Commons

We’re inching closer to the end of the fiscal year and Connecticut lawmakers at the state capitol still haven’t been able to reach a budget agreement. Meanwhile at the nation’s capitol, Senate Republicans are postponing a vote on their controversial health care bill.

This hour: a tale of gridlock in Hartford and Washington. 

NY State IPM Program at Cornell University / Creative Commons

The tick population in Connecticut is on the rise, and so is the threat of Lyme disease — and other tick-borne illnesses.

This hour, we hear the latest from medical professionals and policy makers about the need for new funding and research to battle a “growing tick problem” in the Northeast.

The credit rating for Massachusetts is now on par with most New England states. That's after a major credit rating agency downgraded the state's bonds.

CT-N

Health insurers who sell plans on the state’s exchange got a chance Wednesday to defend their request for hefty rate rises next year. 

Tax Credits / Creative Commons

As Connecticut lawmakers continue to try and work out a new two-year budget, the parents of children and adults with developmental disabilities worry about the services they might lose.

This hour, we hear from these families and learn what’s at stake.

ilirjan rrumbullaku/creative commons

Tax-exempt property and the impending departure of Aetna are two issues weighing heavily on Hartford as the capital city manages a fiscal crisis. 

Ksenia Andreeva / Creative Commons

Hartford is inching closer and closer to insolvency — at a time when Connecticut is facing a fiscal crisis of its own.

This hour, we talk about the B word. Without the state to lean on, could Hartford file for bankruptcy?

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