WNPR

elections

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

It didn’t take long for the gloves to come off in the race to be Connecticut’s next governor.

David DesRoches / Connecticut Public Radio

Two self-funding millionaires Tuesday secured their spots at the top of the ballot in the November 6 election.

Ned Lamont, now the undisputed Democratic Party nominee for governor, trounced Joe Ganim in a race that was called by The Associated Press just 30 minutes after primary polls closed at 8 p.m.

Updated at 12:30 a.m. ET

Vermont voters made history on Tuesday as Christine Hallquist, a transgender woman, won the Democratic primary for governor.

Hallquist, who will now face Vermont Republican Gov. Phil Scott in the general election, becomes the first openly transgender person to ever win a major party's nomination for governor in U.S. history. If she wins in November, she'd be the nation's first transgender governor.

Lamont, Stefanowski Win Party Nominations For Governor; Hayes Upsets In 5th District

Aug 14, 2018
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Updated at 11:30pm

Political rookie Jahana Hayes has pulled off an upset in the Democratic primary in the 5th Congressional District. Her opponent Mary Glassman conceded the race, congratulating Hayes as a "tough competitor" who ran a good race. Hayes is a former National Teacher of the Year. She will face former Meriden mayor Manny Santos in November.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It's Primary Day in Connecticut! We know a lot of people can't vote in today's primaries because they're either not registered with one of our two major political parties, they're one of the millions of Americans on vacation during one of our final weeks of summer, or they just don't know about it. Maybe, it's all of the above.

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

After months of candidate debates, interviews, and campaign ads, it’s time for Connecticut residents to cast their ballots in the state's primary elections.

This hour, we take a look at what we can -- and cannot -- expect at the polls this Primary Day. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Secretary of the State Denise Merrill expects voter turnout in Tuesday’s statewide primary elections to be greater than the 20-to-25 percent of the party-affiliated voters that usually come out for the August primaries.

Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

In this last week before the August 14 party primaries, the debates, and endorsements--not to mention those tree-killing mailers clogging our post office boxes--are coming fast and furious.

Here's a sample of the questions we're contemplating at this critical stage:

Alyssa Hurlbut / CTMirror.org

Haddam has been at the center of an uproar ever since Selectwoman Melissa Schlag knelt during the Pledge of Allegiance at a town meeting. For Schlag, it was a way of demonstrating her disapproval of President Donald Trump and his administration's policies. For others, it was an insult to the American flag.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut experienced an increase in new voter registration after the 2016 presidential election.

The secretary of the state’s office is reporting that 275,114 new voters registered between the between November 2016 and July 2018, an increase over data collected 20 months out from the 2014 mid-term election.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

After an eight-year stint as Trumbull's first selectman, Republican Tim Herbst is campaigning to move up the political ladder... to the office of the governor of Connecticut.

This hour, we sit down with the candidate. We ask about his decision to run and learn about the issues he would prioritize if elected to lead the state.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Joe Ganim was once a rising Democratic star who was turning around Connecticut’s largest and most troubled city. But then the Bridgeport mayor was convicted of 16 counts of felony corruption in office and sentenced to seven years in federal prison.

Surprisingly, Ganim returned to Bridgeport and was elected mayor once again.

Now, he is asking voters to choose him as Connecticut’s next governor.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

What do Manny Santos, Rich DuPont, and Ruby Corby O’Neill have in common? Well, yes, they are Republicans… but more than that, they are all running for Connecticut’s 5th Congressional District seat.

This hour, we meet the candidates.

We learn about their backgrounds and talk about the issues central to their campaigns… and to the residents they hope to represent. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Mark Boughton is no stranger to Connecticut politics. He has been the mayor of Danbury since 2002, and also waded into the governor’s race the past two election cycles. This time, Boughton is coming into the race with the GOP party endorsement, though he’ll be on a crowded ballot with four other Republican hopefuls.  

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Employment and health care top the list of issues concerning Connecticut voters, according to a recent poll.

Pages