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Senator Richard Blumenthal has introduced a resolution in the Senate calling on the government to declassify and release documents related to 9/11. Families of the victims of the massacre believe the documents will show the true extent of the government investigation into the hijackers’ ties to sponsors in Saudi Arabia.

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

Police departments across the country, including New Haven, report that they’re seeing a rise in internet-related crimes. One officer even took a literary approach to the problem.

Discovery Communications, LLC

Thomas Harris's Hannibal Lecter series. "Criminal Minds" on CBS. In the past year, there've been "Mindhunter" on Netflix and "Manhunt: Unabomber" on Discovery.

It seems we're fascinated by forensic psychology, by criminal profiling, by... mindhunting.

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

A new unit at Connecticut's York Correctional Institution was formally unveiled Monday. The specialized unit focuses on preparing young women offenders for life after prison.

Believe it or not, Lorena and John Wayne Bobbitt (and their kitchen knife) entered the public consciousness 25 years ago last week.

And this week, former UConn athlete Sue Bird and her girlfriend, Megan Rapinoe, became the first same-sex couple to appear on the cover of ESPN The Magazine's The Body Issue.

Scott Davidson / Flickr

An 18-year-old died when the stolen vehicle he was riding in crashed during a police chase Thursday in Bridgeport. The city’s police department said the car was being driven by a 15-year-old. 

Updated at 12:31 p.m. ET

A federal judge ordered Donald Trump's former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, to jail on Friday following allegations by prosecutors that he tampered with witnesses in his case.

"You've abused the trust placed in you six months ago," said Judge Amy Berman Jackson. "I thought about this long and hard, Mr. Manafort. I have no appetite for this."

But Berman Jackson said she could not turn a blind eye to the charges that Manafort had attempted to contact witnesses in his case after he was on bail.

Centers for Disease Control And Prevention (CDC)

Amid the high-profile deaths of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain came news of a new CDC report outlining a rise in U.S. suicide rates. This hour, we take an in-depth look at the numbers with Dr. Jill Harkavy-Friedman of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

Plus: On the heels of last month’s violent storms, we hear about efforts underway to restore one of the state’s most damaged -- and beloved -- outdoor areas: Sleeping Giant State Park.

And finally: In search of a good ol' non-fiction murder mystery? Or, better yet, one with a Connecticut twist? Look no further than New London’s The Day. A little later, reporter Karen Florin and digital news director Carlos Virgen take us behind the scenes of the newspaper's new crime podcast, Case Unsolved. Have you been listening?

Family Equality / flickr creative commons

Kim Kardashian rose to fame as a friend of Paris Hilton. She has a sex tape. She's been the subject of any number of reality TV shows. Kardashian is, for many people, the very definition of "famous for being famous."

The Nose's charter includes a provision specifically requiring that we cover all things Kim Kardashian. But then, this week, we learned that she has the power to will presidential commutations into being. That's actually almost too much substance for The Nose to parse. Almost. But not quite.

Dan McKay / flickr creative commons

When I hear the word "diorama," the first thing I think of is Mr. Mack’s fifth grade class and painting hills and grass and clouds and a fence into a shoebox and making little cardboard cut outs of Lassie and the boy she loved. God, I hated that stuff.

The second thing I think of is a place like the Peabody Museum in New Haven and their incredibly, obsessively, over-the-toply detailed dioramas of the plant and wildlife of Connecticut.

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

A Hartford police officer is in critical condition after being stabbed in the neck Thursday.

scyther5 / iStock

Seniors lose billions of dollars a year to financial fraud, ranging from mass mailings and threatening robocalls, to telemarketing and identity theft. Experts around the country, including Connecticut, are focused on combating the problem. 

In Boston federal court, mobster Stephen “The Rifleman” Flemmi isn’t the one currently on trial. But listening Wednesday to the defense teams’ opening arguments in the murder trial of his former partner and the partner’s associate, it was hard to tell.

James Forman, Jr. won a Pulitzer Prize for his book, "Locking Up Our Own: Crime And Punishment In Black America."
Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

This year’s Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction went to former public defender, now Yale University law professor, James Forman, Jr. for his book Locking Up Our Own: Crime And Punishment In Black America.

Joe Gratz / flickr creative commons

For an American Sign Language-interpreted version click here.

Since 1989, more than 2,000 people have been identified as victims of wrongful convictions in the U.S. In 2015 and 2016, the wrongfully convicted were exonerated at a rate of about three per week.

This hour, a look at the reality of, psychology behind, and institutionalized pressures toward wrongful convictions in America.

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