WNPR

courts

Lori Mack / CT Public Radio

The recent retirement announcement of Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy has sparked questions about the future of abortion rights. During his tenure, Kennedy voted to uphold abortion rights in several cases. Now agencies like New Haven’s Planned Parenthood of Southern New England are worried that the Trump administration will seek to appoint a justice who will overturn the 1973 Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision, the ruling that established a woman’s constitutional right to abortion.

Paolo Zialcita / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut union organizers say they’ll persevere in the face of a stinging defeat at the Supreme Court.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Both Connecticut’s U.S. senators are urging Democrats to resist the appointment of a new Supreme Court justice until after November’s elections.

Updated at 5:54 p.m. ET

Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy announced his retirement Wednesday, setting the stage for what promises to be an epic political battle over his replacement.

A Trump nominee is likely to be far more conservative than Kennedy, who, though appointed by President Ronald Reagan, voted with the court's liberals in some key cases.

Updated at 10:50 a.m. ET

In a blow to organized labor, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that government workers who choose not to join a union cannot be charged for the cost of collective bargaining.

The vote was a predictable 5-4. Justice Samuel Alito wrote the majority opinion with the court's conservatives joining him.

Mark Fischer / Creative Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court decision to uphold President Trump's travel ban on five Muslim-majority countries as well as Venezuela and North Korea, is drawing criticism from Democratic lawmakers, the American Civil Liberties Union, and many Muslim groups.

Updated at 11:26 a.m.

The U.S. Supreme Court has reversed a lower court decision upholding a California law requiring anti-abortion crisis pregnancy centers to more fully disclose what they are.

Updated at 6:40 p.m. ET

In a 5-4 ruling that gave broad leeway to presidential authority, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld President Trump's travel ban that barred nearly all travelers from five mainly Muslim countries as well as North Korea and Venezuela.

The president's proclamation was "squarely within the scope of Presidential authority under the INA," the court wrote in its majority opinion, referring to the Immigration and Nationality Act.

"A moment of profound vindication"

Mark Fischer / Creative Commons

A group representing Connecticut retailers is hailing Thursday's decision by the Supreme Court that will allow states to collect sales tax on online purchases. The 5-4 decision strikes down a 1992 case that restricted states from collecting sales tax from retailers that do not have a physical presence in their state.

The controversy over President Trump's executive order to end the policy of separating migrant families who cross into the U.S. illegally is shifting to the courts.

Some online sales are about to start costing more.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday that states can require retailers to collect and remit sales taxes on out-of-state purchases. The 5-to-4 decision reversed decades-old decisions that protected out-of-state vendors from sales tax obligations unless the vendor had a physical presence in the state.

SalFalko (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Amid a heated debate about immigration on the Mexican border, immigration attorneys say there’s a much wider crisis in legal representation across the country.

Mark Mirko / Hartford Courant

Richard Robinson has been sworn in as Connecticut’s next Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. He is the first African American to hold the post. 

Almonroth, Wikimedia Commons

President Donald Trump’s acceptance of business from foreign governments will be be examined in court this week as a lawsuit brought by members of congress, including Senator Richard Blumenthal, gets a hearing 

Updated at 12:56 p.m. ET

A federal judge on Tuesday ordered a new hearing at which she is expected to consider accusations by prosecutors that former Donald Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort tampered with witnesses in his case.

Judge Amy Berman Jackson ordered Manafort, prosecutors, witnesses and others to be prepared to appear and to testify on June 15, according to the new order.

Prosecutors have asked Berman Jackson to rescind Manafort's bail and order him to jail ahead of his trial, which is scheduled for this autumn.

Pages