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Max Moran / Connecticut Public Radio

Yale University law students staged a sit-in at the school Monday, and also sent a delegation to Washington D.C. They were calling for an investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, a Yale undergrad and law school alumnus. 

Updated at 8:32 p.m. ET

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh says he isn't considering withdrawing following more allegations of sexual misconduct from decades ago, and he proclaimed his innocence in a new TV interview Monday evening.

"I'm not going to let false accusations drive us out of this process," Kavanaugh told Fox News' Martha MacCallum in an interview alongside his wife, Ashley.

C-SPAN

Christine Blasey Ford says she will testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee Thursday over allegations that U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her as a teenager.

Coming up, we wade through the details of the case and get reaction to reports of new allegations against Kavanaugh by a former Yale classmate. 

Max Moran / Connecticut Public Radio

A second allegation of sexual assault has placed Yale University firmly at the center of the confirmation battle for the next Supreme Court justice. A former Yale classmate of nominee Brett Kavanaugh has now come forward to say that he sexually assaulted her at a party when he was in his freshman year at the university.

CTN

Survivors of sexual assault spoke out in Hartford Thursday about the handling of the allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. Dr. Christine Blasey Ford says that Kavanaugh assaulted her at a house party when the two were in high school. 

Brett Kavanaugh is not the first presidential nominee to have his run to the Supreme Court frozen at the finish line by a woman's accusations.

Throughout this week of turmoil in Washington, the historical backstory has been the 1991 confrontation between Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas and a former colleague named Anita Hill.

Updated at 11 p.m. ET

The Senate Judiciary Committee will move forward with a hearing scheduled for Monday on sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh, despite a request for further investigation from his accuser.

Angela N / Creative Commons

Today, we have no guests. We want to hear from you. We canceled our previously planned show so we could dedicate the entire hour to understanding how you are feeling about the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the  Supreme Court.

Updated at 6:26 p.m. ET

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and the woman accusing him of sexual assault more than three decades ago, Christine Blasey Ford, will both testify publicly before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 24. The committee was supposed to vote on the nomination this Thursday but faced pressure after Ford went public with her allegation over the weekend.

Ford and Kavanaugh both agreed to testify under oath before the committee.

UPDATED 6:46 p.m. ET

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh strongly pushed back on an allegation of sexual misconduct from more than 30 years ago. The allegation was made in a letter by a woman who said the incident took place in high school.

"I categorically and unequivocally deny this allegation. I did not do this back in high school or at any time," Kavanaugh said in a statement.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The state of Connecticut is attempting to recover almost $11 million of taxpayer money it says was lost to an illegal kickback scheme run through the pharmacy benefit plan for state employees. 

C-SPAN

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is set to face a second round of questions from the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday. He's expected to be questioned about his views on previous Supreme Court cases, as well as a range of policy issues. Kavanaugh is also likely to be questioned about his work on Ken Starr's independent counsel investigation of former President Bill Clinton, and his time working in the White House under former President George W. Bush.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal speaking to reporters in Hartford on November 13, 2017.
Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The White House has cited executive privilege in withholding 100,000 pages of documents from the record of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

David Davies / Creative Commons

Hearings on the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court begin next week, and Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal says he’ll be questioning the judge on his views on net neutrality. 

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh shares one important view with President Trump: Both are deeply suspicious of any attempt to limit the president's power over executive branch officials.

That view could have important consequences for special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into the Russian interference in the 2016 election, which includes allegations of collusion and possible obstruction of justice.

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