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Angela N / Creative Commons

Today, we have no guests. We want to hear from you. We canceled our previously planned show so we could dedicate the entire hour to understanding how you are feeling about the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the  Supreme Court.

UPDATED 6:46 p.m. ET

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh strongly pushed back on an allegation of sexual misconduct from more than 30 years ago. The allegation was made in a letter by a woman who said the incident took place in high school.

"I categorically and unequivocally deny this allegation. I did not do this back in high school or at any time," Kavanaugh said in a statement.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The state of Connecticut is attempting to recover almost $11 million of taxpayer money it says was lost to an illegal kickback scheme run through the pharmacy benefit plan for state employees. 

Brett Kavanaugh appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee Tuesday.
C-Span

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is set to face a second round of questions from the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday. He's expected to be questioned about his views on previous Supreme Court cases, as well as a range of policy issues. Kavanaugh is also likely to be questioned about his work on Ken Starr's independent counsel investigation of former President Bill Clinton, and his time working in the White House under former President George W. Bush.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal speaking to reporters in Hartford on November 13, 2017.
Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The White House has cited executive privilege in withholding 100,000 pages of documents from the record of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

David Davies / Creative Commons

Hearings on the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court begin next week, and Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal says he’ll be questioning the judge on his views on net neutrality. 

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh shares one important view with President Trump: Both are deeply suspicious of any attempt to limit the president's power over executive branch officials.

That view could have important consequences for special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into the Russian interference in the 2016 election, which includes allegations of collusion and possible obstruction of justice.

Jesus Garzon / Connecticut Public Radio

Every Democratic member of the Senate Judiciary Committee has joined in making a Freedom of Information Act request for records related to the career of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. 

Updated at 7:34 p.m. ET

After an initial focus on Paul Manafort's lavish spending, including on luxury suits and home landscaping, the former Trump campaign chairman's trial has now moved squarely into the heart of his alleged financial crimes

On Day 4 of the federal trial Friday in Alexandria, Va., jurors heard from two of Manafort's former tax accountants, Cindy Laporta and Philip Ayliff. Their testimony directly addressed the bank and tax fraud charges the government has brought against Manafort.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A Syracuse University study revealed that the Hartford Immigration Court on average sets the highest bonds in the nation for undocumented immigrants facing deportation proceedings. At $15,000, it’s twice the national average.

Updated at 6:15 p.m. ET

President Trump asked his attorney general to stop Robert Mueller's special counsel investigation Wednesday morning, as the first trial stemming from that investigation entered its second day.

Paul Manafort, Trump's former campaign chairman, is on trial in Alexandria, Va., for bank and tax fraud charges, not, as Trump noted in a Twitter thread Wednesday morning, for "collusion."

Cody R. Wilson/"@radomysisky" on Twitter

Connecticut has announced it’s joining a group of states suing the federal government over a settlement reached in June with a Texas group that wants to distribute blueprints to create untraceable guns by 3D printing.

Ryan Caron King/Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

With just three weeks before the August 14 Democratic and Republican primaries, taglines and sound bytes are all the rage in the governor's race. Positions on a substantive issue? Not so much.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Local advocates for migrant children separated from their parents at the United States border said Monday that they don’t believe the Trump administration will meet a court-ordered deadline to bring the families together. The deadline imposed by a U.S. district court in California is July 26.

Paolo Zialcita / Connecticut Public Radio

A federal judge in Bridgeport has ruled that the Trump administration violated the constitutional rights of two Central American migrant children when federal authorities took them at the Texas border and sent them to Connecticut without their parents. 

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