WNPR

Connecticut legislature

Governor Dannel Malloy responded to concerns about his plan to revise the system of teacher tenure on WNPR's Where We Live. His education proposals have been the subject of hearings at the Legislative Office Building this week.   Malloy has made education reform a key part of his agenda for this legislative session - thus a 163 page plan that includes changes to state funding models, pushes consolidation of small districts and invests more in charter schools. But the largest chunk of his state of the state address was devoted to the issue he knows is the most controversial.

In April, Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra will present next year's budget to city council.  As WNPR's Jeff Cohen reports, he's got a pretty big hole to fill between now and then. The city's current budget is about $547 million, and it's running just a slight deficit.   But next year could be much, much worse. 

Governor Dannel Malloy's mid-term budget adjustments make some notable changes to the way the state pays for healthcare.  WNPR's Jeff Cohen reports. In 2010, the state started a temporary program to provide health benefits to some uninsured, low-income residents. But now the state says that program is over enrolled and too expensive.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And now to lawmaking at the state level. In Connecticut, residents will have to do some advance planning for their Super Bowl parties. The state is one of only two that still bans the sale of all alcohol at stores on Sundays. But Jeff Cohen of member station WNPR reports, that could change.

Harriet Jones

Connecticut Senate Democrats say they want to tweak the jobs bill that passed in last fall’s special session, in order to make it more effective for businesses. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

Senate leaders chose the shopfloor of a successful Connecticut manufacturing business to make this announcement, Adchem Manufacturing Technologies in Manchester. Senate President Don Williams.

Reporter Roundtable

Jan 19, 2012
Chion Wolf

Senator Ed Meyer introduced a bill on Tuesday to repeal the death penalty in Connecticut. He says the future of capital punishment in the state may depend on two key lawmakers.

Last year – just as Connecticut was poised to repeal the death penalty, and as jury selection was underway in the Cheshire triple murder case  -  Senator Ed Meyer received a phone call from his son. 

School superintendents say the public education system in Connecticut needs an overhaul. The superintendents have unveiled a bold plan to transform schooling in the state.

It's not enough anymore to give kids an opportunity to learn, says Joseph Cirasuolo, executive director of the CT Association of Public School Superintendents. He says schools have to insure that all kids achieve at high levels.

Two major bills aimed at boosting job creation in Connecticut have passed the legislature in a special session. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

Lawmakers Wednesday approved a $626 million effort to revamp Connecticut’s economic development strategy. Among other measures the jobs bill contains a grant and loan program for small businesses, plans to streamline state regulation, new approaches to workforce development and tax credits for hiring the long-term unemployed. House Majority leader Brendan Sharkey.

Chion Wolf

The state legislature is calling a special session tomorrow. It’s a tale of two bills: Jobs and Jackson Labs.

Governor Malloy has unveiled a jobs plan.  It’s focused on small business growth, startup investments for innovative firms, and streamlining the process for business to get things done.  
These are all ideas that the governor and legislative leaders expect to get some level of bi-partisan support.

NationalAtlas.gov

Every ten years, the U.S. Census is taken and every ten years, the legislative map is redrawn. In states like Connecticut - that process is handled by a legislative committee - an arrangement that leads many to wonder about whether politics plays too large a role in who we get to vote for.

As ProPublica reporters have been uncovering, corporations, unions and other special interests have gotten heavily involved in redrawing district lines.

Chion Wolf

Every ten years, a bipartisan committee made up of members of Connecticut's General Assembly go through the tedious process of redrawing legislative and congressional maps. Often the Reapportionment committee's work breaks down into partisan politics. Earlier this week, the Reapportionment committee wrote a letter to Governor Dannel Malloy acknowledging that they will miss their September 15th deadline, which is today. Joining us by phone is House Minority leader and co-chair of the Reapportionment committee Lawrence Cafero.

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