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The number of Hillary Clinton-sponsored advertisements in this year's general election is half of what President Barack Obama aired four years ago. And it is one third of what it was in 2012 for the Republican candidate. But lower ad volumes are just one of the many things intriguing researchers about this year's campaign.

Lori Mack / WNPR

Quinnipiac University’s Polling Institute in Hamden has gained national recognition for its public opinion polls. It's been highly rated for accuracy in predicting primary and general elections. It's also cited regularly by major news outlets around the country. 

The polling process, however, is continuously being analyzed -- and there are more challenges than you might think.

A week ago, Hillary Clinton was looking to run up the score against Donald Trump. Her campaign was running ads in Texas and planning a trip to the traditionally red state of Arizona.

Today, she heads out on that trip, but in a presidential election that has now seen a tightened race from where it was a week and a half ago.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

While the extraordinary spectacle of the presidential battle has commanded most of the attention in this election, there are interesting things at stake here in Connecticut on the state level. 

It's that time again: time for Americans to figure out how, exactly, their presidential election works. "Electoral College" searches spike every four years, just before Election Day, according to Google ... and the search volume is picking up right now.

Long story short: To win the presidency, you don't have to win the majority of the popular vote. You have to win the majority of electoral votes — that is, 270 of them.* In most states, a candidate wins electoral votes by winning the most voters.

Mara Lavitt / WNPR

A Facebook notification on Monday reminding people to register to vote is likely having a real effect. The state said it brought in 15,000 newly registered voters on that day alone. 

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

In a letter to several Democratic senators Monday, the Justice Department said it "will continue to work closely with the FBI and together, dedicate all necessary resources and take appropriate steps as expeditiously as possible" regarding the review of thousands of newly discovered emails that may be relevant to the investigation of Hillary Clinton's email server.

This year, politicians and political action committees have spent millions of dollars connecting Republican candidates to Donald Trump, and Democrats to the policies of Governor Dannel Malloy.

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

Federal agents now have a search warrant they need to examine the thousands of emails found on a computer belonging to former U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner that could be pertinent to the investigation of Hillary Clinton's personal email server, sources familiar with the matter tell NPR's Carrie Johnson.

Weiner is the estranged husband of Clinton aide Huma Abedin.

FBI Director James Comey is facing criticism for turning the agency's attention to newly discovered emails that could be linked to Hillary Clinton, again focusing on the former secretary of state just days before Election Day.

Former prosecutors and former Department of Justice officials are questioning what Comey hopes to accomplish by announcing the investigation so close to the election.

Updated at 7:58 p.m. ET

Newly discovered emails being examined by the FBI in relation to Hillary Clinton's email server came to light in the course of an unrelated criminal investigation of Anthony Weiner, a source familiar with the matter tells NPR's Carrie Johnson.

Weiner is the estranged husband of close Clinton aide Huma Abedin; he has been under scrutiny for sending illicit text messages to an underage girl. Sources said authorities seized electronic devices in their home, which led them to this new information.

Imagine for a moment that it's Jan. 21, 2017. After a chilly inauguration the day before, the parades and festivities have ended. And the new president of the United States is ready for his or her first day of work.

"What follows is my 100-day action plan to make America great again," Donald Trump told supporters in Gettysburg, Pa., last weekend. "First I will announce my intention to totally renegotiate NAFTA, one of the worst deals our country has ever made."

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Republican leaders in Connecticut are condemning a recent digital advertisement linking Republican candidate for state legislature William Petit to presidential candidate Donald Trump.

The chair of the state Republican Party said a Democratic candidate has violated state election law by invoking the name and image of Donald Trump in a political ad.

From the outset, Democrats needed a very big-wave election to get to the 30 seats they need to win back control of the House. Then, a video of Donald Trump surfaced showing the GOP nominee making lewd comments, and later multiple women accused him of groping them. That left some wondering if these scandals could trigger that wave.

But that simply hasn't happened.

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