WNPR

Where We Live

MONDAYS, TUESDAYS, THURSDAYS, AND FRIDAYS AT 9:00 AM AND 7:00 PM

Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.

Reach us when we're live at (860) 275-7266.

When we're live in our New Haven studios call us at 203-776-9677.

On any given day, we explore topics you may be talking about at your job or at home. From immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We explore the latest scientific research and how worldwide events impact us locally.

We highlight our diverse communities. We want to hear your stories.

Join the conversation with host Lucy Nalpathanchil, every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Reach us in the newsroom with pitches or questions at (860) 275-7272.

Contact the producers:
Lydia Brown, Senior Producer
Carmen Baskauf, Producer

WNPR's Digital Producer is Carlos Mejia. The technical producer is Chion Wolf.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Mark Boughton is no stranger to Connecticut politics. He has been the mayor of Danbury since 2002, and also waded into the governor’s race the past two election cycles. This time, Boughton is coming into the race with the GOP party endorsement, though he’ll be on a crowded ballot with four other Republican hopefuls.  

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour, we sit down with Republican gubernatorial contender Steve Obsitnik.

What drove the Westport-based veteran and businessman to enter the race? What kind of future does he envision for the state and its residents?

We find out and we also hear from you. 

Later, political experts Ben Mallet and Bilal Sekou provide analysis of our interview and tell us what they will be watching for in the weeks leading up to August 14

WBZ-TV

Rhode Island’s new toll program made more than half a million dollars in one month.  But only tolling tractor-trailers has led to a lawsuit by the trucking industry not to mention criticisms from some Rhode Island politicians.  

Stock Catalog / Creative Commons


Type the word "diet" into a search engine and... bam... you’ll unlock a goldmine of results: diet books, diet blogs, diet pills, and other evidence of a diet-crazed world.

But what drove society to become so obsessed with food restriction? How did something as simple as eating become so complicated?

This hour, we take a bite out of... diets and diet trends... with guest host David DesRoches.

 

We also look back on the history of the federal government's Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR). What impact has the program had on the diets and health of Native communities?

 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Inside our genomes, we carry information about our recent ancestors as well as ancient human history. This hour, we sit down with science writer Carl Zimmer to talk about his new book, She Has Her Mother's Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity. We ask him what our DNA can—and can’t—tell us about where we’re from and who we are.

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Max Pixel

Public trust in the media is at historic lows. Today, Americans believe that the majority of news they encounter is biased, according to recent polling by Gallup.

This hour, guest host David DesRoches asks--why are journalists losing ground and what can they do to regain trust?

Excerpt from The Dialogues by Clifford V Johnson
Clifford V Johnson / MIT Press

It’s summer! That means if you’re lucky, you’ll have extra time to read a book while you're sitting on the beach, laying poolside, or after sneaking out of work early.

Recently on Connecticut Public Radio’s Where We Live, host Lucy Nalpathanchil interviewed Petra Mayer, an editor at NPR Books. Mayer went through the best books for you to explore this summer across multiple genres--from this year’s latest releases to upcoming new titles.

The Blue Diamond Gallery / Creative Commons

Sure, you’ve heard the words “midlife crisis.” It’s possible you’ve even used them... you know, to justify that flashy new car you purchased at age 50?

But what exactly is a midlife crisis? Is it truly a crisis? Or something else? This hour, we take a closer look with Jonathan Rauch, author of the new book The Happiness Curve

Plus: too old to work? We wade through some of the challenges preventing older career-seekers from landing new employment.

And finally: harassment in the workplace. What can a small-business employee do when a situation with a boss or colleague gets out of hand? We find out. 

Books DAMSELFLY and THE DIALOGUES
Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Check out some of the titles recommended during this episode here.

Now that it’s summer, it’s time to head to the beach with a good book! For many of us, vacation is one of the few times we get to read for fun. Don’t know what book to pick up? Where We Live has got you covered.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio


Ned Lamont is a familiar name in Connecticut politics. The Greenwich businessman has run for the U.S. Senate and for governor. And now he’s trying again.

 

In May, Lamont easily won enough delegate votes to become the Democratic nominee for governor in 2018. This hour, we sit down with the candidate.

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Pregnancy is lifechanging, but for some women, that may come at the cost of their career.

This hour: A New York Times investigation looked at thousands of lawsuits by women and found that pregnancy discrimination is widespread in many American companies. We find out more from reporter Natalie Kitroeff.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

This hour, we learn about a new online series about "extreme inequality" in Connecticut.

We also look at trends in white shark activity off the coast of Cape Cod.

But first, an update on hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico. How well-equipped are the island and its residents to face a possible next storm?

Carmen Baskauf / WNPR

It’s usually historians and scholars who get excited when a university acquires an ancient document. But in the 1960s, a map acquired by Yale University caused such a stir it divided the country.

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

This hour, we take you on an exclusive behind-the-scenes tour of Monrovia Nursery Company in Granby, Connecticut.

We meet up with self-proclaimed 'plant geek' and Connecticut Garden Journal host Charlie Nardozzi, and get a lesson on the company's history and cultivation techniques.

Later, we listen back to our interview with Mark Richardson and Dan Jaffe, co-authors of the book Native Plants for New England Gardens.

We discuss tips and tricks for native plant gardening, and take your comments and questions. 

KatarzynaBialasiewicz/iStock / Thinkstock

This hour, we give an overview of the NAACP's newly-announced prison gerrymandering lawsuit against Connecticut. Why did the organization choose to target our state? And why now?

Plus, a breakdown of the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in the case of Janus v. AFSCME. What does the justices’ decision mean for the future of Connecticut’s public-sector unions?

But first, the timeline for legal recreational marijuana sales in Massachusetts remains a bit... hazy. We get the latest on the Bay State’s budding industry and find out what lies ahead for pot retailers. 

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