Race For Governor 2018: Oz Griebel | Connecticut Public Radio
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Race For Governor 2018: Oz Griebel

Oct 19, 2018

He was at the head of the Hartford-area economic development group, MetroHartford Alliance, from 2001 to last year. Now, he wants to be governor of Connecticut.

This hour we sit down with Oz Griebel, who is running as an unaffiliated candidate for governor of Connecticut.

Griebel has name recognition in the Hartford region and is polling at 11 percent among likely voters, according to a recent Quinnipiac poll.

Griebel is positioning himself as a moderate outside of the partisanship of today’s politics. But does he have what it takes to gain the support of voters across the state--especially without the endorsement of any major party?

We get insight from two political analysts after the interview.

Do you have a question or comment for Oz Griebel?

Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

GUESTS:

  • Oz Griebel - Unaffiliated candidate for governor of Connecticut (@OzForGovCT )
  • Renny Fulco - Associate Professor of Legal and Policy Studies at Trinity College
  • Dr. Jonathan Wharton - Assistant Professor of Political Science and Urban Affairs at Southern Connecticut State University (@PreppyProf )

READING LIST:

Hartford Courant: Oz Griebel Still Trails Major-Party Gubernatorial Candidates, But Popularity Rises In Latest Poll - Independent Oz Griebel has the backing of 11 percent of likely Connecticut voters, according to a poll made public Wednesday, an uptick he points to as proof of gathering momentum and one political observers say thrusts him into a pivotal role divvying up Connecticut’s large share of unaffiliated voters.

CT Mirror: Griebel: Tapping pension funds risky — doing nothing is worse – “In a recent interview with the CT Mirror, the independent gubernatorial candidate said he’s aware of the criticism that’s been directed at him  since Sept. 13, when he said he would consider deferring a portion of the estimated $2.6 billion Connecticut owes next fiscal year to its pension funds for state employees and municipal teachers. ‘I know we are trying to buy time, but buying time is not an insignificant thing to me,” he said. “I think this problem is going to be on top of us much sooner than anyone anticipates.’”

Chion Wolf contributed to this show.