WNPR

Ryan Caron King

Visual + Radio Reporter

Ryan Caron King is an award-winning visual and radio reporter for Connecticut Public Radio and the New England News Collaborative, a network of eight public media newsrooms across the Northeast. He makes short documentary videos, news photography, and radio stories.

Since September 2017, Ryan has been covering the impact of Hurricane Maria on Puerto Ricans with ties to Connecticut in WNPR's "The Island Next Door" reporting project. 

In 2018, he won a National Edward R. Murrow Award for one of the videos he made reporting in Puerto Rico. He also won a New England Emmy for video journalism and several Connecticut SPJ awards. 

At WNPR and for the collaborative, Ryan has covered a variety of topics, including addictionimmigration, and the environment. Some of his radio work has aired nationally on NPR's Morning Edition, Here & Now, and All Things Considered -- and several of his videos have been posted on NPR's Facebook page. He's also a licensed drone pilot. 

As a student at the University of Connecticut, Ryan was the manager of his college radio station. He graduated from UConn with a Journalism/English double major in 2015. In his spare time, he likes to make music and think of new nicknames for his friends' dogs. 

Watch some of Ryan's recent videos below.

Ways to Connect

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

An estimated 13,000 Puerto Ricans came to Connecticut after Hurricane Maria, according to The Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Según el Centro para Estudios Puertorriqueños del Colegio Universitario Hunter, un estimado de 13000 puertorriqueños vino a Connecticut luego del huracán María.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The Walk Bridge is a century-old “swing bridge” in Norwalk that carries hundreds of trains each day along Connecticut’s southern coast.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Hartford’s hurricane relief center was where evacuees from Puerto Rico could come to get help: help finding housing, jobs, winter clothing -- whatever supplies or services they needed to restart their lives in Connecticut.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

El centro de socorro por el huracán, de Hartford, era donde los evacuados de Puerto Rico podían ir para buscar ayuda: ayuda para conseguir vivienda, trabajos, ropa de invierno; cualquier suministro o servicio que necesitaran para recomenzar sus vidas en Connecticut.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The memory of Hurricane Maria still lives with Carmen Cotto.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

El recuerdo del huracán María aún vive en Carmen Cotto.

"El huracán devastó la isla," dijo Cotto. "Me devastó a mí. Devastó a mí familia. Y a todas las familias. Porque abrir la puerta y ver lo que vimos, todavía me llena los ojos de lágrimas."

Miles de puertorriqueños como Cotto dejaron sus hogares en la isla para vivir en Connecticut después del ataque del huracán María en el otoño pasado. Ahora, a medida que Puerto Rico se recupera lentamente de la tormenta, algunos están regresando a casa.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

A coalition of activist groups, union organizers, and elected officials are calling for Yale University to disclose and cancel its holdings in Puerto Rican debt.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Una coalición de grupos activistas, organizadores sindicales y funcionarios electos están solicitando a la Universidad de Yale que publique y cancele sus participaciones en la deuda puertorriqueña.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Brian Rivera was finishing breakfast in the lobby of the Red Room Inn in downtown Hartford. He’s been living there with his wife and two toddlers since December. And he didn’t know yet if he’d have to move out soon.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Brian Rivera estaba terminando su desayuno en el lobby de la posada Red Roof en el centro de Hartford. Ha estado viviendo allí con su esposa y sus dos hijos pequeños, desde diciembre. Y no sabía aún, si tendría que mudarse pronto.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Members of Hartford’s Puerto Rican community held a rally and a candlelight vigil Friday night in front of the hotel where dozens of hurricane evacuees from the island have been living since Hurricane Maria.

Hurricane evacuees Yara Vasquez (left) and Wanda Ortiz (center) watch a press conference at the hotel they were living in with their families under a FEMA program on January 19, 2018.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The Federal Emergency Management Agency says that two dozen Puerto Rican families who relocated Hartford will no longer be eligible for housing assistance on Monday because inspections showed little or no damage to their homes in Puerto Rico.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Only days after the Federal Emergency Management Agency said it would pay for dozens of hurricane evacuees to stay in a Harford hotel until mid-February, state officials were told by FEMA on Thursday there had been an error, and that several of the families had to vacate their temporary housing. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

State officials say that several dozen Puerto Rican families who were at risk of losing federal housing assistance could now have their stay in Connecticut extended until mid-February.

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