WNPR

Patrick Skahill

Reporter

Patrick Skahill is a reporter at WNPR. He covers science with an emphasis on health care and the environment. Prior to becoming a reporter, he was the founding producer of WNPR's The Colin McEnroe Show, which began in 2009 and won a PRNDI award in 2011. 

He writes about science for The Beaker. 

Patrick's reporting has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition, Here & Now, and All Things Considered. He has also reported for the Marketplace Morning Report. 

A graduate of Villanova University, Patrick holds a bachelor's degree in history with a concentration in Arab & Islamic Studies and a minor in Classical Studies. He holds a master's degree in Social Sciences from the University of Chicago. He knows way too much about Seinfeld.

He can be reached by phone at 860-275-7297 or by email: pskahill@wnpr.org.

Wikimedia Commons

Following the death of a man on the Merritt Parkway this month, officials say more tree trimming alongside state highways is needed.

Wikimedia Commons

For a few moments, one of the world’s foremost experts on gravity was free of it. His smile -- and his eyes -- couldn’t have been brighter.

Photo Phiend / Creative Commons

The mayors of some of Connecticut’s largest towns are hoping to ride their political connections into the state’s highest office. One obvious way to do that is to court campaign donations. But politicians running for election in 2018 need to be savvy enough to raise that money quickly, and to raise it right -- stockpiling tiny contributions from all over Connecticut -- in the hopes of unlocking a multi-million dollar prize: public financing.

OregonDOT / Creative Commons

Think of “shared solar” as a community garden, but for energy.

Geoff Wake / Creative Commons

Every morning, Mary Hollis follows a routine. Breakfast is oatmeal with granola, coffee, and maybe some yogurt or applesauce to help wash down her medication.

During the winter, the retiree says she “shivers” through the meal.

The nation's first off-shore wind farm off the coast of Block Island, Rhode Island in October 2016.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The manager of New England's power grid says for the first time ever, there are more proposals for new wind power projects than there are for natural gas. But getting those wind turbines up and running is a totally different ballgame.

Utility crews in Viejo San Juan, photographed in November, 2017.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

When Hurricane Maria hit, Puerto Rico was already in a bad spot. The island was in a deep recession, its state-run utility was basically broke, and for years, the power grid hadn’t been updated.

Efraín O’Neill is looking for something different.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Cuando el huracán María atacó, Puerto Rico ya estaba en una mala situación. La isla estaba en una recesión profunda, sus servicios públicos,  administrados por el estado, estaban prácticamente quebrados.

Selbe Lynn / Creative Commons

Federal authorities were in Hartford this week, taking comment on President Donald Trump’s proposal to expand offshore drilling for oil and gas. Lately, the politics surrounding offshore drilling have changed a lot.

Connecticut State Capitol
Jim Bowen / Creative Commons

Legislators convened in Hartford Tuesday to decry a budget sweep, which took tens of millions of dollars out of energy efficiency programs and swept it into the state's general fund.

Mataparda / Creative Commons

New England’s controversial “Northern Pass” energy project is on hold. The nearly 200-mile-long transmission line would have brought in hydropower from Canada, but recently got blocked by regulators in New Hampshire.

jjbers / Creative Commons

Connecticut drivers renewing their vehicle registrations will pay an additional $10 fee starting this week. The fee will support a fund called "Passport to Parks."

Thomas Hawk / Creative Commons

Connecticut's legislative session kicks off this week -- and one item of discussion could be changes to the state's "bottle bill." For the past several years, legislators have considered changing the law charging consumers a 5-cent deposit on containers of beer, water, or soda.

-Tripp- / Creative Commons

Legislators from nine states -- including five in New England -- are calling for a tax on carbon emissions. The idea is to make pollution part of the price of doing business.

Pete Jelliffe / Creative Commons

The state’s latest budget crisis means tens of millions of dollars set aside to make homes and businesses more energy efficient will instead be pumped into the state’s general fund.

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