WNPR

Lydia Brown

Senior Producer

Lydia Brown is senior producer of the daily WNPR news-talk show, Where We Live, hosted by Lucy Nalpathanchil.  

Before she became a producer, Lydia interned for WNPR's The Colin McEnroe Show and Where We Live

She holds a B.A. in Journalism and Music from New York University.

Ways to Connect

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour: we sit-down with Connecticut Department of Correction Commissioner Scott Semple. In recent months, Semple’s agency has garnered statewide attention -- specifically with regard to reports involving prison health care and security.

We take a closer look at those issues and talk more broadly about trends within Connecticut's prison system.

Do you have a question or comment for Commissioner Semple? We want to hear from you. 

Michele Lamberti / Creative Commons

Guilt. Ah, yes, that awful, anxiety-ridden five-letter word. Most of us have experienced it. All of us have learned to dread it. But is a little guilt really such a bad thing?

This hour, we consider that question and more with a series of guilt (note we did not say “guilty”) experts. We check in with a researcher at the University of Virginia and with a psychologist based in New York. And we want to hear from you, too. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

Watching her mother’s battle with diabetes fueled one Connecticut resident’s passion for health and fitness.

This hour, New Haven-based author and entrepreneur Mubarakah Ibrahim joins us.

We talk about her upcoming book, mR40 method, and learn about her unique journey as a wellness coach and Muslim-American. 

c-George/iStock / Thinkstock

Whether you’re young or old(er), has retirement planning got you swimming in a sea of dollar signs and question marks? Have no fear!

This hour, we look at best practices to help keep your head above water and make the most of your financial future. 401(k)s, Roth IRAs… we check in with a certified financial planner and take your calls, tweets, and emails.

Plus: learning to save at an early age. We hear how a series of local “reality fairs” is teaching Connecticut’s high school students the value of financial literacy. 

Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

Gary Lewis

The death of J. Edgar Hoover in 1972 marked a turning point within the F.B.I.: the opening of the bureau’s ranks to women.

Connecticut native Sheila Horan was among the first to sign on, kickstarting a 28-year career with the federal agency.

This hour, we listen back to our recent conversation with Horan.

It’s the latest in WNPR’s “Making Her Story” series, highlighting prominent women with ties to Connecticut.

Colin Dunn / Creative Commons

A mosaic of boldly colored labels and brightly lit bottles, the vitamin aisle is as much a drug store staple as it is a monument to a multi-billion dollar industry. This hour, we trace the history of dietary supplement sales in the U.S. and consider why these supplements remain so popular today. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

In light of mismanaged abuse allegations involving two former staffers, U.S. Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty announced Monday she will not seek re-election in November.

This hour, we discuss the significance of Esty's decision -- including what it means for Connecticut's Fifth Congressional District race this year.

Plus: With former VA Secretary David Shulkin out, what lies head for U.S. Veterans Affairs? Is the federal agency on track to become privatized? We find out.

And finally: We sit down with a local Army veteran who recently received a discharge upgrade. Could his story help other Connecticut veterans with less than honorable discharges? 

Lydia Brown / WNPR

This hour: a lesson in public history. How are towns and cities across Connecticut and the Northeast engaging residents with the past?

We check in with a team of experts and historians. We look at examples of locally driven projects and initiatives, and consider their impact on community building and sense of place.

Do you feel a strong tie to your community’s history? We want to hear from you. 

Library of Congress

This hour: As Women's History Month draws to a close, we draw attention to a Connecticut native who was integral in the campaign for civil rights -- Judge Constance Baker Motley.

Coming up, we take an in-depth look at Judge Motley's life and talk about her legacy both inside and outside of the courtroom.

Plus: Suzan-Lori Parks’ Father Comes Home From the Wars Parts 1, 2 & 3 opened at Yale Repertory Theatre earlier this month.

We learn more about the production and find out how the Theatre’s ongoing WILL POWER! initiative is exposing students to the arts. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

The November midterms are fast-approaching -- raising concerns about election security and the safeguarding of local voter identity.

This hour, we look at how Connecticut is responding with Secretary of the State Denise Merrill.

Plus: a Middletown-based prison program gives incarcerated adults the opportunity to work towards an Associate degree behind bars.

We learn about the Wesleyan Center for Prison Education and its recent degree-granting collaboration with Middlesex Community College.

And finally: Have recent weather reports left you feeling underwhelmed? Don’t be upset with your local forecaster, says Quinnipiac University professor Ben Bogardus.

Coming up, Bogardus joins us along with NBC Connecticut Chief Meteorologist Ryan Hanrahan. And we want to hear from you. 

Mohd Fazlin Mohd Effendy Ooi Follow / Creative Commons

This hour, we discuss the debate concerning a woman’s right to abort her fetus following a Down syndrome diagnosis.

We also look at how advances in medical technology have changed the way health professionals screen for the a genetic disorder during pregnancy.

How far has prenatal testing progressed? And where is it headed? We find out.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

They've gone years without a raise. Now, members of Connecticut's private group home workforce are calling for a boost in support from the state.

With a possible strike looming this April, we speak to Josh Kovner from the Hartford Courant for an update. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Catherine Smith is Commissioner of Connecticut's Department of Economic and Community Development. This hour, she stops by for an update on the state's economy and manufacturing workforce.

Later, we also check in with Goodwin College President Mark Scheinberg. How is his school training the next generation of manufacturing employees? We find out and we also hear from you. 

Alice Collins Plebuch

Unearthing family history -- one saliva sample at a time.

This hour: how low-cost DNA testing helped spawn an industry and, with it, a new wave of genealogical sleuthing.

Ancestry.com, 23andMe, Family Tree DNA -- how far are you willing to go and how much are you willing to spend to better understand your roots? 

Mike Dunphy.

She grew up knowing more about "farming than feminism." Now she serves as leader of the oldest women's foundation in the country. 

This hour: a conversation with Teresa Younger, President and CEO of the Ms. Foundation for Women.

It's the fourth installment in Connecticut Public Radio's “Making Her Story” series highlighting prominent women with ties to Connecticut. 

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