WNPR

Lucy Nalpathanchil

Host of "Where We Live"

Lucy is the host of WNPR's popular talk show, "Where We Live," a 2018 winner of two national awards from Public Radio News Directors, Inc., or PRNDI.  Lucy and her team were awarded second place in the categories of "Call In Program" and "Interview.

She's been a public radio reporter for nearly 20 years covering everything from education to immigration, juvenile justice and child welfare issues to veterans' affairs and the military.

Connecticut has been her home for a decade now after Lucy moved here in 2006 to become WNPR's Assignment Editor.

She's also been local host for mid-day programming and for "All Things Considered."

She contributes to National Public Radio and her stories have aired on several national NPR shows including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Weekend All Things Considered, Here and Now, and Latino USA.  

During her time in Connecticut, Lucy has focused on immigration including New Haven's controversial ID card program, efforts for an in-state tuition law for undocumented students, and the Becoming American series: stories of immigrants and the citizenship process.  In 2011, Lucy launched the Coming Home Project to tell the stories of returning Afghanistan and Iraq War veterans in transition. To learn more about the military, Lucy was chosen to take part in a week-long training for journalists hosted by the U.S Army at Fort Leavenworth, KS and Fort Leonard Woods, MO. Getting up at 3:30 am to participate in boot camp was most memorable! 

In September of 2014, she was selected to join military reporters around the country for a conference hosted by the Medill National Security Journalism Initiative in Washington D.C.

Lucy has worked in several states as a public radio reporter after beginning her career at WDUQ in Pittsburgh. She's received awards from Pennsylvania's Golden Quill, the New York State Associated Press, the Mayor's Asian American Advisory Board in Jacksonville, Florida, the Connecticut Associated Press and the state's Society for Professional Journalists chapter.

When she's not in the newsroom, Lucy enjoys traveling, hiking, and planning her next garden. She and her husband, Jason live in Suffield with their two children and a small zoo.

Ways to Connect

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff / Creative Commons

U.S. President Donald Trump signed an executive order Wednesday halting the at-the-border separation of immigrant children and families. Coming up, we wade through the details of the decision and consider its significance moving forward. 

Later, we talk about chronic pain and its impact on young children. We hear from a Connecticut mother whose son was diagnosed with amplified musculoskeletal pain syndrome (AMPS) and learn about the out-of-state program that treated him.

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Listen on Tuesday at 9:00 am.

Black children are three times more likely to drown in the United States than white children. This hour, we learn the history behind this deadly disparity.

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The USDA recently proposed recommendations that would require foodmakers to label their products if they contain genetically modified ingredients.

Genetically modified crops have been portrayed as everything from a dangerous health risk to a miracle solution to tackle world food shortages. But among all this debate, many of us may not really know what a “genetically modified organism” (GMO) even is.

This hour, we ask: what does it actually mean for food to be genetically modified, and should we care if it is?

Mrs. Charles Stephenson (Grace Murray) / Wikimedia Commons

Next Tuesday is “Juneteenth”, a holiday that marks the day that slavery finally ended in Texas--two years after the Emancipation Proclamation. This hour, we learn more about Juneteenth and how the holiday came to be commemorated nationwide. The Amistad Center will explain why this day is still relevant today.

Many people think of American slavery as a Southern problem, but there were in fact enslaved people in Connecticut until 1848. We take a look at the history and legacy of slavery right here in Connecticut.

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Guilt. Ah, yes, that awful, anxiety-ridden five-letter word. Most of us have experienced it. All of us have learned to dread it. But is a little guilt really such a bad thing?

This hour, we consider that question and more with a series of guilt (note we did not say “guilty”) experts. We check in with a researcher at the University of Virginia and with a psychologist based in New York. And we want to hear from you, too. 

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The Affordable Care Act’s protection for people with preexisting conditions is one of the most important provisions in the law. But that may be in jeopardy after a decision by the Department of Justice to not defend the ACA in a lawsuit filed by 20 states.

Centers for Disease Control And Prevention (CDC)

Amid the high-profile deaths of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain came news of a new CDC report outlining a rise in U.S. suicide rates. This hour, we take an in-depth look at the numbers with Dr. Jill Harkavy-Friedman of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

Plus: On the heels of last month’s violent storms, we hear about efforts underway to restore one of the state’s most damaged -- and beloved -- outdoor areas: Sleeping Giant State Park.

And finally: In search of a good ol' non-fiction murder mystery? Or, better yet, one with a Connecticut twist? Look no further than New London’s The Day. A little later, reporter Karen Florin and digital news director Carlos Virgen take us behind the scenes of the newspaper's new crime podcast, Case Unsolved. Have you been listening?

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Inside our genomes, we carry information about our recent ancestors as well as ancient human history. This hour, we sit down with science writer Carl Zimmer to talk about his new book, She Has Her Mother's Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity. We ask him what our DNA can—and can’t—tell us about where we’re from and who we are.

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Sure, you’ve heard the words “midlife crisis.” It’s possible you’ve even used them... you know, to justify that flashy new car you purchased at age 50?

But what exactly is a midlife crisis? Is it truly a crisis? Or something else? This hour, we take a closer look with Jonathan Rauch, author of the new book The Happiness Curve

Plus: too old to work? We wade through some of the challenges preventing older career-seekers from landing new employment.

And finally: harassment in the workplace. What can a small-business employee do when a situation with a boss or colleague gets out of hand? We find out. 

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For months, Cape Town, South Africa was on the brink of disaster. After severe droughts, the city warned that “Day Zero” was coming--the day the city would run out of water entirely. Now, the date for Day Zero, originally predicted to be in April or May 2018, has been pushed indefinitely to 2019.

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In the U.S., an estimated 100,000 Americans live with sickle cell disease, or SCD.

Yet, despite its impact, the disease and its patients remain largely out of the public eye.

This hour, C-HIT reporter Peggy McCarthy helps us understand why. We discuss the realities of SCD awareness and hear from a New Haven resident living with the disease.

Plus: inside U.S. drug courts.

What approach do these programs take in addressing the nation’s opioid crisis? And are they accessible here in Connecticut? We find out. 

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Fruit flies. You may have seen one or two dancing above your fruit bowl. But what about under a microscope?

Believe it or not these seemingly insignificant insects have had a long and (dare we say) fruitful history in advancing scientific research.

This hour, First in Fly author Dr. Stephanie Mohr joins us to explain why.

Later, we also take a deeper look into the realm of so-called “true flies” with London-based "fly girl" Dr. Erica McAlister

Technical Sergeant John L. Houghton, Jr., United States Air Force / Wikimedia Commons

In March 2003, the U.S. invaded Iraq--in what turned out to be a baseless search for hidden “weapons of mass destruction.” Fifteen years later, we are still dealing with the deadly fallout of the decision to go to war.

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Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Samite Mulondo went from a refugee camp in Kenya to collaborating with Paul Simon. This hour, the musician and Uganda native joins us to share his story and his music.

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What do goldenrod, milkweed, and wild bergamot have in common? All are plants that are native to the New England region.

This hour, we talk about the beauty and value of native plant gardening with Mark Richardson and Dan Jaffe, co-authors the new book Native Plants for New England Gardens.

What native plants are best suited for your backyard plot or porch pots? We take your questions.

Plus: sowing in the city. A Connecticut garden expert shares her tips for successful urban planting. 

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