WNPR

John Dankosky

Executive Editor, NENC

John is Executive Editor of the New England News Collaborative, an eight-station consortium of public media newsrooms. He is also the host of NEXT, a weekly program about New England, and appears weekly on The Wheelhouse, WNPR's news roundtable program.

Previously, he was Vice President of News for CPBN, and Host of Where We Live,  twice recognized by PRNDI as America’s best public radio call-in show. You can also hear him as the regular fill-in host for the PRI program Science Friday in New York. He has worked as an editor at NPR in Washington, and reported for NPR and other national outlets on a variety of subjects.

As an editor, he has won national awards for his documentary work, and regularly works with NPR and member stations on efforts to collaborate in the public media system. As an instructor, John has held a chair in journalism and communications at Central Connecticut State University and been an adjunct professor at Quinnipiac University. He is also a regular moderator for political debates and moderated conversations at The Connecticut Forum , the Mark Twain House and Museum, The Harriet Beecher Stowe Center, The World Affairs Council of Connecticut and The Litchfield Jazz Festival.

John began his radio career at WDUQ in Pittsburgh, his hometown.

Ways to Connect

Fall foliage in New England.
Andrew Phelps / WBUR

Abandoned farmhouse with turbines in the background. Meridian Way Wind Farm, Cloud County, Kansas.
Philip Warburg

New England’s wind energy world changed dramatically this week when Denmark-based Ørsted acquired the developer of America’s first-ever offshore wind farm, Rhode Island-based Deepwater Wind. The Danish company currently has offshore wind projects in development with Rhode Island, Connecticut, Maryland, and New York. Combined, the two companies say they hope to deliver offshore wind power to seven states on the east coast by 2030 (you can read more about this deal on WNPR and

A view of the forest canopy near the site of the discovery of the barrels.
Photo by Jason Moon and Allie Gutierrez

Author Porter Fox in the Boundary Waters. Photo by Sara Fox
Sara Fox

The northern border and the unique landscape of the northern United States that surrounds the border is the subject of Porter Fox’s new book: Northland: A 4,000-Mile Journey Along America’s Forgotten Border. In it, Fox details his own travels along our northern border, a trip he made on foot, by boat and by car along the winding, often remote, U.S.-Canada border, starting in the state where he grew up, Maine.

RV1864, Flickr

Rocky Marciano is known around the world as the greatest heavyweight champion of all time. But what’s not as well known about the boxer is his strong connections to New England.

Rocky Marciano, born Rocco Marchegiano, grew up in Brockton, Massachusetts. His first professional fight was in Holyoke, MA. And most of his professional fights throughout his career were fought in Providence, Rhode Island. 

Cousins Maine Lobster

Sabin Lomac and Jim Tselikis are no strangers to the Maine lobster bake. They grew up in Maine, and, although they have since moved away, their childhood memories of simple, homemade lobster rolls inspired them to start a business: Cousins Maine Lobster

Senator Richard Blumenthal, center, with New Mexico Senators Martin Heinrich and Tom Udall.
Sen. Blumenthal's Office

Several members of Connecticut’s congressional delegation are calling on the Trump administration to step up efforts to reunite families separated as they crossed the southern U.S. border. 

Ninian Reid / Creative Commons

This hour, we provide analysis of President Trump's State of the Union address. Much of the speech was aimed at bridging a divide between disgruntled hardliners now unsure about Trump’s seriousness on immigration, and more traditional Republicans, hoping to draft off a rising stock market and their tax cut win.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The race for governor of Connecticut just got a lot more interesting. Joe Ganim, former inmate, current mayor of Bridgeport, unable to qualify for state financing, has announced that he’s in the race -- and establishment Democrats are worried about him getting into a primary.

Connecticut State Capitol / Wikimedia Commons

The state budget stalemate that goes on for months, and results in a budget that isn’t balanced. An unpopular governor tangles with a newly divided legislature over control of spending -- and not surprisingly, many big names ask, “do I really want that job?” 

Cali4beach / Creative Commons

Last night saw the unlikeliest of upsets in Alabama. Democrat Doug Jones, propelled by a big turnout from the state's urban and suburban voters, very narrowly defeated Republican Roy Moore in a special election that could have big consequences in Washington - and even in Connecticut. 

Leave out for a minute any analysis of what this means as a referendum on Trumpian politics, or the race for congress in 2018, this win by Jones could mean that Republicans’ tax bill is in jeopardy. 

Olin Gilbert, creative commons

Allegations against Alabama Republican Roy Moore -- who is accused of sexual misconduct with minors -- don't seem to be stopping his bid for the U.S. Senate. On Tuesday, President Trump openly endorsed him, saying we should believe Moore because "he said it didn't happen." 

Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

Attorney General - and former Senator - Jeff Sessions has spent more time on Capitol Hill than he’d like over the last few months, again facing tough questioning about what he did and didn’t know about contacts between Russia and the Trump campaign he was a part of. 

ABC News

Two famous Connecticut families have their names enshrined on buildings and roads. Both are back in the news for different reasons this week. 

Pages