WNPR

Harriet Jones

Managing Editor

Harriet Jones is Managing Editor for WNPR, overseeing the coverage of daily stories from our busy newsroom.

She also reports on all aspects of the business world for WNPR. She's covered such diverse issues as the threat to close Connecticut's submarine base, the sub prime mortgage crisis and the impact of casinos on the state.

In 2011, she created WNPR's Small Business Project as a way to tell stories about the companies that make up 90 percent of our economy, but often get overlooked in the media.

She is the winner of an Edward R. Murrow award for her reporting on Connecticut's 2010 floods.

Harriet joined WNPR in October 2000 as Morning Edition producer and reporter. Born in Scotland, she worked for the BBC for much of her early career.

She was news director at Scotland's largest commercial radio station, ScotFM, and was lucky enough to cover that country's two biggest political events in 300 years - the referendum which delivered a new parliament, and the subsequent elections.

She has also taught broadcasting for the BBC at some of their international schools in Eastern Europe, delivering courses to journalists in Romania, Albania and Bosnia.

Harriet lives in Stonington with her husband, Bob Statchen, and their three children.

Photo Phiend / Creative Commons

Legislative leaders say they may consider a special session to look at potential problems with the state’s tax incentive programs for businesses. An audit of economic development incentives administered by state officials has found inaccuracies in both the level of tax credits and the amount of job creation achieved by the companies that benefited. 

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

A landmark Supreme Court case over eminent domain and people’s right to private property is back in the headlines with the new movie “Little Pink House.” It tells the story of the Fort Trumbull neighborhood in New London, which was the scene of an epic struggle between a municipality that wanted to take property for the purpose of economic development, and the homeowners who resisted every step of the way. 

Jennifer Sanchez, an employee at Lifebridge Community Services in Bridgeport, benefits from the EITC
Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

As tax time comes down to the wire, an advocacy group is trying to raise awareness of one very under-used tax credit. It’s called the Earned Income Tax Credit, and it’s been boosting the income of low-wage workers for more than 40 years. But it’s still such a well-kept secret that it’s estimated as many as one in five people who are eligible never claim it. 

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

Last fall, President Donald Trump announced that he wanted the federal government to stop funding the National Endowment for the Arts. Reaction to that proposal was swift and bipartisan -- and in fact, in the budget that passed last month, there’s not a cut, but a tiny increase in arts funding. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The full legislature will get an opportunity to vote on two key gun control bills this session. Measures that would ban so-called ghost guns and bump stocks both passed out of the Judiciary Committee Tuesday. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s Fifth District representative, Elizabeth Esty has announced she will not stand for re-election in November. The decision follows days of intense pressure on Esty, over her handling of a harassment case in 2016 involving her then-chief of staff. 

Connecticut State Capitol
Jim Bowen / Creative Commons

Lawmakers heard arguments Monday against what critics say will be a disastrous new system of fiscal restraint in Connecticut. As the law stands now, bonds issued by the state from the middle of next month will include a guarantee to the bondholder - a so-called bond lock. 

Ingram Publishing / Thinkstock

Connecticut won’t be in the forefront of states attempting to reinstate net neutrality rules -- for the moment at least. A bill that would have required internet service providers to give a level playing field to all internet content died in committee this week. 

Scott Beale

Connecticut lawmakers are under pressure over legalizing the recreational use of marijuana as Massachusetts gets set to sell pot from July of this year. 

Electric Boat

Connecticut’s entire congressional delegation voted for the omnibus spending bill which was signed, rather grudgingly, last week by President Donald Trump. 

SergeyVButorin/iStock / Thinkstock

Last night’s snowstorm may not have lived up to the hype, but it has prompted one small but significant change in the way the state handles its emergency management.

Photo by Jacqueline Serna/Americares

Six months on from Hurricane Maria, Stamford-based nonprofit Americares still has staff in Puerto Rico, helping the island’s health services recover from the storm and provide much-needed care to residents.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut’s Fourth District Representative Jim Himes believes Congress has an opportunity this week to afford legal protection for special prosecutor Robert Mueller in the face of increasing attacks against him by President Donald Trump. 

Courtesy of Wesleyan’s Special Collections & Archives

Wesleyan University is celebrating one of its own this month as it honors former U.S. Poet Laureate Richard Wilbur.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal
U.S. Senate Democrats

Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal is introducing legislation that would allow federal authorities to remove guns from a person who is deemed a threat to themselves or others. 

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