WNPR

Ebong Udoma

As WSHU Public Radio’s award-winning senior political reporter, Ebong Udoma draws on his extensive tenure to delve deep into state politics during a major election year. In addition to providing long-form reports and features for WSHU, he regularly contributes spot news to NPR, and has worked at the NPR National News Desk as part of NPR’s diversity initiative.

Ebong has covered presidential visits and high profile political races such as former wrestling executive Linda McMahon's two unsuccessful bids for the U.S. Senate. He has also reported on several state and municipal corruption trials in Connecticut, including one that led to the resignation of former Governor John Rowland. Ebong keenly follows developments with Native American tribes in Connecticut and produced an award-winning feature on the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation.

Ebong recently returned from his native Nigeria, where he spent a year helping to establish the international media network Gotel Africa. During his time there, he trained and managed local reporters and covered major stories, such as the presidential election in Nigeria and the government’s offensive against Boko Haram.

Prior to joining WSHU in 1994, Ebong was an award-winning reporter with the Connecticut Post. He also covered political transitions in Nigeria in 1993 and 1999 for Pacifica Network News.

The Republican Governors Association is targeting Connecticut as its best chance of gaining a seat in the November election.

A new study by the Wesleyan Media Project finds Republican candidates are praising President Donald Trump at record rates in their advertising for November’s midterm election.

Michael Franz, co-director of the Wesleyan Media Project, said the study is their first look at national broadcast and cable television advertising for the 2018 midterm and they’ve found even a few red state Democrats are speaking positively about Trump.

In a debate in New Haven Thursday night, the two candidates contesting the Connecticut Democratic Party primary for governor sparred over who would best represent the Connecticut voter. The debate was sponsored by the Connecticut Association of Realtors.

The Connecticut House of Representatives has approved a $12 annual surcharge on the insurance policies of every residential homeowner in the state. The bill passed by a bipartisan vote of 97 to 42 during a rare weekend session on Saturday.

The legal retail of marijuana in Massachusetts begins July 1. That’s prompted Connecticut lawmakers to once again consider legislation to allow the sale of marijuana in the state. Similar legislation failed last year.

Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy is to give his final State of the State address to lawmakers at the beginning their 2018 legislative session on Wednesday. The Democrat, who’s not seeking a third term, is expected to call for the return of highway tolls, spending cuts and a range of tax changes.

U.S. Senator Chris Murphy, D-Conn., says he believes Congress will eventually reauthorize federal funding for the Community Health Center Fund, which constitutes the largest chunk of federal money that goes to community health centers. Murphy gave the assurance to health care providers and clients at an OPTIMUS Health Care clinic in Bridgeport’s East Side neighborhood on Thursday.

A plan to merge Connecticut’s 12 state-run community colleges into one system received mixed reviews at a legislative hearing in Hartford on Tuesday.

Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy has nominated state Associate Supreme Court Justice Andrew McDonald to be Connecticut’s next chief justice. If confirmed, McDonald would be the first openly gay state chief justice in the country.

Connecticut lawmakers have rescheduled Friday’s special session for Monday because of the snow. The lawmakers want to use the session to restore funding to a program that helps elderly and disabled state residents cover Medicare expenses. 

Legislative leaders in Connecticut are to meet this week to discuss the state’s continued fiscal problems despite having recently passed a bipartisan budget.  

The Connecticut Television Network, CT-N, resumed live coverage on Monday. The public affairs network that has covered state legislature and government since 1999 had gone dark for a little over a week due to a dispute over funding and editorial control.

Shortly before 2 a.m. Thursday morning, the Connecticut Senate passed a long-awaited, bipartisan compromise state budget agreement. The $41 billion two-year budget passed by an overwhelming vote of 33 to 3. It now heads to the state House of Representatives for a vote later today.

The Democratic President of the Connecticut Senate says written copies of the bipartisan budget agreement reached last week might be available as soon as Tuesday. Senator Martin Looney said this after meeting with members of his Democratic caucus on Monday afternoon.

Connecticut’s consumer advocate announced on Tuesday that her office will join an investigation into whether the state’s largest utilities are manipulating the natural gas market. The investigation is led by the state’s Public Utility Regulatory Authority.

Pages