WNPR

Diane Orson

Managing Editor/Host

Diane Orson is WNPR's local host for Morning Edition.  She's also a reporter and managing editor for WNPR, as well as a contributor to National Public Radio. Her stories are heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here And Now.  Diane began at WBUR in Boston and came to Connecticut in 1988 as a co-producer for Open Air New England.  She shared a Peabody Award with Faith Middleton for their piece of radio nostalgia about New Haven's Shubert Theater.  Her reporting has  been recognized by the Connecticut Society for Professional Journalists and the Associated Press, including the Ellen Abrams Award for Excellence in Broadcast Journalism and the Walt Dibble Award for Overall Excellence.

Diane is also an active professional musician. She lives in Hamden with her husband and two children.

Diane Orson / Connecticut Public Radio

Updated 7:00 pm

There has been a rash of suspected drug overdoses on the New Haven Green Wednesday, with at least 46 people taken to area hospitals. One person has been arrested in connection with the case. 

Jose Jimenez-Tirado

When Hurricane Maria barreled into Puerto Rico last year, it swept away homes, businesses, and jobs. Not only did it leave a catastrophic environmental mess, but Maria also blew away any remaining cover for the island’s dire fiscal crisis. That’s affecting the basics of life like power and education, but it goes further. Shifting financial priorities are also affecting the arts.

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

Cleanup continues more than two months after a tornado hit Sleeping Giant State Park in Hamden - one of several tornados that touched down in Connecticut during severe storms in May.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Tony Sheridan was just appointed to serve as chairman of the Connecticut Airport Authority. 

Yale Center For Asylum Medicine

A paper published in this month’s Journal Of General Internal Medicine calls for more doctors to be trained in asylum medicine. These doctors and clinicians perform medical forensic evaluations for people seeking asylum, to assess their claims of persecution and torture.

Courtesy of the artist.

The International Festival of Arts and Ideas in New Haven hosts the premiere of a play called Requiem for an Electric Chair. It’s written and performed by Congolese actor Toto Kisaku who was granted asylum in the U.S. earlier this year. He lives now in Connecticut.

Today we wrap up our series called Seeing Things Differently: Autism Spectrum Disorder. Connecticut Public Radio contributor Dr. Thyde Dumont-Mathieu brings us the voices of four Connecticut mothers, who talk about parenting children who’ve been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. 

Lisa Wilson (top right) with her family in Hartford, Connecticut. Her son was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

A growing body of research indicates that there are disparities based on race and ethnicity in health care overall. This is also true in the field of autism.

HStocks / Thinkstock

Union leaders representing janitors, maintenance, and food service workers in Connecticut say the end of Temporary Protected Status for Honduras is unfair and will tear families apart.

Feverpitched / Thinkstock

New federal data find that about one in 59 children has autism spectrum disorder.

Melanie Barocas

Back in the days of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, ballroom dancing was all the rage. Then came the 1960s, when partner-dancing moved off to the sidelines. But ballroom is back on the dance floor – both socially, and increasingly as a competitive sport.

It's Complicated
Roberta Friedman

This week saw the end of an era in Cuba, as Raul Castro stepped down from the presidency on Thursday. During the island’s decades of comparative isolation, film and art have offered rare glimpses into life in Cuba.

Connecticut State Library, State Archives Picture Group 034

One of Connecticut’s most highly decorated World War I veterans is featured in a new animated film, opening in theaters nationwide Friday. He warned his fellow soldiers of a possible gas attack, located wounded men in the field, and even helped to catch an enemy spy hidden in the Allied trenches.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Walt Disney’s hit film "Black Panther" broke new ground as the first mainstream superhero movie with a predominantly black cast and plenty of strong leading women. The film’s music also opens new doors: introducing authentic African sounds into an action-packed Marvel movie score. Central to those sounds is the talking drum from West Africa which can be heard sailing above many of the orchestral and choral arrangements.

Garry Monk, executive director of the National Veterans Council for Legal Redress speaks in Hartford with Sen. Chris Murphy looking on.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Inside the omnibus appropriations bill recently signed into law is legislation that, for the first time, provides mental health care for tens of thousands of combat veterans and sexual assault victims who’ve received other-than-honorable discharges.

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