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Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

The new trade deal with Canada and Mexico has been warmly welcomed by farmers, manufacturers and business groups across the country, but not always for the reasons President Trump anticipated.

While the president has touted improvements and changes as compared to North American Free Trade Agreement, many people are focusing on what didn't change and expressing relief that there's a deal at all.

Updated 5:37 p.m. ET

Facebook says that it has discovered a security breach affecting nearly 50 million accounts and that it's not yet clear whether any information was accessed or any accounts were otherwise misused.

The vulnerability that caused the breach was found Tuesday and was fixed on Thursday night, Facebook says. It was the result of bugs introduced into Facebook's code in July 2017. No passwords or credit card numbers were stolen, the company says.

Vermont state Rep. Kiah Morris has resigned from office, citing extensive racial harassment and telling The New York Times that the lack of response from local law enforcement has been "stunning."

Morris, who was the only black woman in the state Legislature, announced in August that she wouldn't run for re-election. She wrote that political discourse had become "divisive, inflammatory and at times, even dangerous."

The Dutch government is considering a proposal to ban the use of smartphones and other "mobile electronic devices" on bicycles.

Infrastructure Minister Cora van Nieuwenhuizen published the draft legislation on Thursday, NL Times reports. If approved, it could go into effect in the summer of 2019.

It is already illegal to use a phone while driving a motor vehicle in the Netherlands, the news site says. Offenders face a fine of more than $250.

The outside attorney who will be directing questions to Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is a prosecutor from Arizona who has dedicated her career to prosecuting sex crimes — and pushed for best practices in investigations to protect and serve victims of assault.

Rachel Mitchell is head of the sex crimes unit at the Maricopa County Attorney's Office and has decades of experience prosecuting criminal cases of sexual assault and abuse.

Nawaz Sharif, the former prime minister of Pakistan, has been released from prison on bail as he challenges his conviction and 10-year prison sentence.

Sharif, who served three nonconsecutive terms as prime minister, was in London during his trial earlier this year. He was found guilty of corruption in absentia and returned to Pakistan to appeal his conviction two months ago — and was promptly arrested and imprisoned.

Sometimes wildlife photographers capture images that are awe-inspiring, thought-provoking, dramatic, emotional.

And sometimes, they catch one moose sticking its tongue out at another.

Yes, it's that time of the year — time for the Comedy Wildlife Photo Awards.

The awards highlight the most amusing animal pictures of the year, to draw attention to wildlife conservation.

In the pre-dawn darkness on Friday morning, work crews removed a controversial statue from San Francisco's Civic Center Plaza, after the city's arts commission unanimously voted to take down the "racist and disrespectful sculpture."

The statue depicts "the degradation and genocide of Native American peoples" using stereotypes that "are now universally viewed as disrespectful, misleading, and racist," the arts commission said in February.

Updated at 7:45 p.m. ET

Dr. Leana Wen, the health commissioner for the city of Baltimore, has been named the new president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America.

It will be the first time in nearly five decades that a doctor is the head of Planned Parenthood, according to the organization. She's replacing longtime President Cecile Richards, who announced in January that she would be stepping down.

This summer, the Trump administration transferred nearly $10 million away from the agency that responds to disasters and emergencies, redirecting it toward one of President Trump's top priorities — the deportation of undocumented residents of the U.S.

The funds transfer is prompting the Federal Emergency Management Agency to cut back on training, IT security and infrastructure investments, according to a document sent to Congress and released by Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore.

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

In Charleston, S.C., a major interstate is reversing direction for about 100 miles, sending every lane inland — even earlier than originally scheduled.

In the Outer Banks, N.C., where tourists and residents rely on a few bridges and ferries for access to the mainland, authorities are warning residents to get out immediately. The state's governor has taken the unprecedented step of issuing a state-level, mandatory evacuation order, instead of relying on local governments.

Updated at 9:15 p.m. ET

California has established an ambitious goal of relying entirely on zero-emission energy sources for its electricity by the year 2045.

Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill mandating the electricity target on Monday. He also issued an executive order calling for statewide carbon neutrality — meaning California "removes as much carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as it emits" — by the same year.

Ford does not intend to start producing the small crossover Focus Active in the United States — no matter what the president has tweeted on the topic.

Ford Motor Company announced more than a week ago that it is canceling plans to produce the car in China and sell it in the U.S., citing the financial toll of the Trump administration's tariffs on vehicles imported from China.

On Sunday, President Trump welcomed the news as a positive sign. "This car can now be BUILT IN THE U.S.A. and Ford will pay no tariffs!" he tweeted.

Updated at 11:35 a.m. ET

Bob Woodward, the author of an explosive new portrayal of President Trump's White House, tells NPR that administration officials are denying his account out of "political necessity."

In his book Fear, which comes out Tuesday, Woodward describes Trump behaving erratically and impulsively, even on significant issues of national security, and insulting some of his senior officials.

President Trump has repeatedly denounced Woodward's book, calling the veteran journalist an "idiot" and his work a piece of "fiction."

Updated at 8:18 a.m. ET on Sept. 10

A police officer in Dallas has been arrested after she shot and killed a young man inside his own apartment on Thursday night, saying later that she mistakenly believed she had entered her own home.

The officer, Amber Guyger, 30, was issued a warrant for manslaughter by the 7th District Court in Dallas County, the Texas Rangers said in a statement on Sunday. "The investigation is ongoing and no additional information is available at this time," the statement said.

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