Bill Chappell | Connecticut Public Radio
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Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the Newsdesk, in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London 2012 to Pyeongchang 2018. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In the past, Chappell has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage on major events.

Chappell's work for CNN included editing digital video and producing web stories for SI.com. He also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, Chappell attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

U.S. military operations in space are back under a single unified command after President Trump ordered the Defense Department on Tuesday to revive the once-retired U.S. Space Command. Vice President Pence outlined the plan during a visit to Florida's Kennedy Space Center.

Updated at 9:40 a.m. ET

Weather and other delays marred what had been anticipated as a banner day for space launches Tuesday, as both SpaceX and Blue Origin were forced to postpone launches that had been scheduled to take place within minutes of each other. Both companies say they will look at moving their launches to Wednesday morning.

Google says it will spend $1 billion to create a new campus in Manhattan, looking to more than double the number of its employees in New York City in coming years. The company currently has more than 7,000 workers there.

The move is the latest high-profile expansion from a U.S. tech giant, following big investments from Apple and Amazon to create office spaces in Texas, New York and the Washington, D.C., metro area.

Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET

Accusing U.S. lawmakers of interfering in its affairs, Saudi Arabia has angrily rejected newly passed U.S. Senate resolutions ending U.S. support for the war in Yemen and laying blame for the death of journalist Jamal Khashoggi at the feet of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

The U.S. military says it hit the al-Shabab extremist group with six airstrikes over the weekend, killing 62 militants in an operation that targeted a camp in southern Somalia. No civilians were harmed, according to the U.S.

U.S. Africa Command says the "precision airstrikes" were conducted in close collaboration with Somalia's government. Four strikes near the town of Gandarshe on Saturday killed a total of 34 militants, and two strikes on Sunday killed 28, the U.S. says.

Updated at 11:50 a.m. ET

Michael Cohen, President Trump's onetime lawyer and fixer, says his former boss knew it was wrong to order hush money payments made during the 2016 presidential campaign to two women who say they had affairs with Trump — but he directed Cohen to do it anyway to help his election chances.

Cohen also said in an interview with ABC News that aired Friday that the president's repeated assertions that Cohen is lying about the payments and other aspects of his work for Trump were false.

Apple plans to build a 133-acre campus in Austin, Texas, that will cost $1 billion and employ 5,000 new workers, the company announced Thursday. The company says the move is expected to make it the largest private employer in Austin.

Apple already employs more people in that city, some 6,200 workers, than it does in any other city outside of its headquarters in Cupertino, Calif. The company now plans to add substantially to that figure.

Updated at 5:33 p.m. ET

Theresa May is keeping her job after all.

The British prime minister survived a no-confidence vote called by members of her own Conservative Party, scoring a critical victory Wednesday in the bruising political battles over Brexit. May will retain leadership of the Tories, and under party rules, she will not face another challenge for at least a year.

The Google+ social network inadvertently gave app developers access to information on some 52.5 million users — even data that users designated as private — because of a "bug" in its software, Google says. The company had already announced it was pulling the plug on the social network because of an earlier incident, and now says the shutdown will happen four months sooner.

Bees may soon get an ally in their fight against bacterial disease — one of the most serious threats the pollinators face — in the form of an edible vaccine. That's the promise held out by researchers in Finland, who say they've made the first-ever vaccine for insects, aimed at helping struggling honeybee populations.

The Rev. Kenneth Hendricks is under arrest in the Philippines, after U.S. and Filipino officials learned of allegations of sexual abuse against the Catholic priest — including accounts that he "had a number of minor boys residing with him," prosecutors say.

Hendricks, 77, faces charges of engaging in illicit sexual conduct in foreign places, a federal crime that could result in up to 30 years in prison. The case is being run by the U.S. Attorney's Office in the Southern District of Ohio — where Hendricks was previously based.

Solar panels will be a required feature on new houses in California, after the state's Building Standards Commission gave final approval to a housing rule that's the first of its kind in the United States.

Set to take effect in 2020, the new standard includes an exemption for houses that are often shaded from the sun. It also includes incentives for people to add a high-capacity battery to their home's electrical system, to store the sun's energy.

Facebook's leaders gave certain big tech companies access to users' data — and the company refused such access to competitors, including the video app Vine, which the social media giant targeted right after it was launched by Twitter.

Cuba's state telephone company will allow mobile phone customers to use the Internet via a new 3G network, starting on Thursday. But as with previous tech advances in the island nation, only those who can afford it will be able to take advantage of the access — which remains under the control of the autocratic government.

A boy's quest to throw snowballs legally in his town ended in victory on Monday, when trustees of Severance, Colo., agreed with a request from Dane Best, 9, to overturn a long-held ban on snowball fights. Best won the town board over with cold logic.

Ohio State football coach Urban Meyer is retiring, the school said on Tuesday. Meyer will depart OSU after a season in which he was suspended for three games over his handling of domestic abuse allegations against an assistant coach. His last game will be in the Rose Bowl on New Year's Day.

Meyer will be replaced by offensive coordinator Ryan Day — who led the team when the head coach served his suspension for the first three games of the 2018 season.

Israel has launched a military operation intended to "expose and destroy" a series of tunnels it says Hezbollah dug into Israel from Lebanon, where the militant group is based. The Israel Defense Forces embarked on Operation Northern Shield on Tuesday, surprising observers on both sides of the border.

French Prime Minister Édouard Philippe says the country's planned fuel tax is now on hold, after weeks of large protests were mounted by people wearing yellow safety vests. In a live TV address, Philippe said, "No tax deserves to endanger the unity of the nation."

The retreat comes after anti-fuel-tax demonstrations devolved into a riot in Paris, with people looting stores, burning cars and spray-painting their messages on the Arc de Triomphe and the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

Updated at 10:54 a.m. ET

Qatar plans to leave OPEC in January, shaking up the alliance of oil-producing nations and furthering its dispute with Saudi Arabia. Qatar made the announcement on Monday — the same day it informed OPEC.

Qatar's Energy Minister Saad al-Kaabi said the small Persian Gulf country will leave OPEC because it wants to focus on natural gas — a sector in which Qatar is a world leader. But the move also draws another line of division with Saudi Arabia, the only country with which Qatar shares a land border.

Updated at 7:25 p.m. ET

The Department of Homeland Security has asked several federal agencies to send civilian law enforcement officers to the border, according to a DHS official. These agencies include the Departments of State, Justice, Energy, Transportation, Labor and Interior, the DHS official said, speaking on the condition of anonymity.

Updated at 8:25 a.m. ET

President Trump, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto signed the new U.S. Mexico Canada Agreement — or USMCA — in Buenos Aires Friday, using the backdrop of the G-20 Summit to resolve a trade dispute between America and its closest neighbors.

Pabst Brewing and MillerCoors have ended a legal dispute that had put the fate of Pabst Blue Ribbon, Schlitz and other blue-collar beers in doubt, reaching a settlement as a jury considered their case. Under the deal, MillerCoors will continue to brew the beers under contract for Pabst.

German police raided Deutsche Bank offices on Thursday, seeking evidence in a money laundering investigation into the practice of hiding money offshore to elude tax collectors and government regulators.

President Trump is expected to extend the deployment of thousands of U.S. troops to the U.S.-Mexico border into January rather than withdrawing the personnel in the middle of December, Pentagon officials tell NPR. The move would further extend the rare deployment of active-duty troops at the Mexico border, rather than just National Guard personnel.

Russia is sending new S-400 surface-to-air missile batteries to its installations in Crimea, its defense ministry says. The move comes days after Russian warships seized several Ukrainian naval vessels, adding to tensions with neighboring Ukraine over the land Russia seized in 2014.

Scotland Yard officers are specially trained to end pursuits of law-breakers on mopeds and motorcycles — by striking them with their own vehicles, as video released by London's police department shows. The footage has sparked a range of reactions, from approval to scorn.

Less than a week after a British academic was sentenced to life in prison in the United Arab Emirates, Matthew Hedges has been freed by a pardon from the UAE's president. Hedges, 31, had been in jail since May. He was accused of spying in the Gulf nation.

Vice President Pence and Russian President Vladimir Putin sat next to each other and chatted briefly Thursday at the East Asia Summit in Singapore, in a conversation that also included national security adviser John Bolton.

Pence and Putin "discussed the upcoming G20 Summit and touched on the issues that will be discussed when President Trump and President Putin are both in Argentina for the summit," according to the vice president's press secretary, Alyssa Farah.

The G20 Summit will be held in Buenos Aires at the end of November.

Saudi Arabia's public prosecutor is calling for the death penalty for five people accused of involvement in the killing of Jamal Khashoggi, the journalist and critic of the royal regime who died last month at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

The office of Prosecutor Saud al-Mojeb issued a statement saying that his office has indicted 11 suspects, adding that the prosecutor "has requested the death penalty for (5) individuals who are charged with ordering and committing the crime."

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