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West Hartford resident Adrienne Doughty recalls the summer night in the family camper when her then-husband hurled an object at her that whipped past head before shattering a window.

Paul Villavisanis / Creative Commons

Do you ever think about the people who make sure the medicine you're taking is safe for you to take? If your like most of us, probably not. 

Updated at 1:30 p.m. ET

Health insurance giant Cigna is buying Express Scripts, the company that administers prescription drug insurance plans for millions of Americans, in a deal worth $67 billion, including $15 billion in Express Scripts' debt.

Lydia Brown / WNPR

It’s the deadliest drug crisis in our nation’s history and communities in Connecticut are coming together to talk about solutions.

This hour, we listen back to a recent opioid panel recorded at Gateway Community College in New Haven.

What’s the best way to support individuals and families battling substance abuse -- especially when one size does not fit all?

Hand dryers in Milford, Connecticut.
Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

Are bathroom hot air hand dryers a better choice than paper towels?

Kadia Doumbia gives testimony at a public hearing.
CT-N

The state legislature is considering a bill that would outlaw female genital mutilation. While federal law already prohibits the practice, Connecticut is one of 24 states where there is no specific state law making FGM a crime, meaning the state itself cannot bring a prosecution. 

As the nation's dairy farmers struggle through their fourth year of depressed milk prices, concerns are rising that many are becoming depressed themselves. The outlook for the next year is so bleak, it's heightening worries — especially in the Northeast — about farmer suicides.

Agri-Mark Inc., a dairy cooperative with about 1,000 members, saw three farmers take their own lives in the past three years. The most recent was last month. It's a very small sample, but very sharp and disturbing increase.

Marco Arment (Flickr Creative Commons)

In the wake of the school shooting earlier this month in Florida, many are trying to make sense of the tragedy.

Last week, President Donald Trump suggested that violent video games and movies are the real culprit. But does the research back up the president's theory?

Hurricane evacuees Yara Vasquez (left) and Wanda Ortiz (center) watch a press conference at the hotel they were living in with their families under a FEMA program on January 19, 2018.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

More than five months after Hurricane Maria, Connecticut researchers are working to better understand the needs of families who’ve relocated from the island to Hartford.

Tania Caruso / Flickr

Where do gender disparities exist for women and girls in our state? And how do we address them?

Paulina Lopez, 32, with her family inside the First and Summerfield United Methodist Church, New Haven.
Sujata Srinivasan / C-HIT

On a snowy Saturday morning in January, Selvin, 13, and his mother were in the basement of the First and Summerfield United Methodist Church in New Haven, to support a friend in sanctuary. As they sat there, the boy tried to push away thoughts of how it would be when ICE came to take away his own mother, who is also under a deportation order.

Creative Commons

It's expensive to die in America. We spend upwards of $3 trillion on medical care, a large percentage of those dollars concentrated in the last year of a person's life.

Vladimir Pustovit / Creative Commons

There are many questions a young woman will face as she matures. Among them: What is her timeline for building a family? And how many kids does she expect to have?

But not all women want to become mothers. 

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

In the event the federal government reduces funding for Planned Parenthood, Governor Dannel Malloy pledged that Connecticut’s Office of Policy and Management would pay $6 million in Medicaid reimbursement to keep Connecticut’s 17 Planned Parenthood centers up and running.

Drugmakers gave millions of dollars to pain-treatment advocacy groups over a five-year period beginning in 2012, in effect promoting opioids to individuals most vulnerable to addiction, according to a new report released Monday by a U.S. senator.

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