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Health

James Childs / flickr

Radiation is everywhere. It's emitted by our sun, by cat litter, by bananas and occasionally by nuclear bombs. It's even emitted by you, and by me, and by every living (and dead) person in the world. So why are we so scared of something so prevalent in our everyday lives?

EP_JHU / CREATIVE COMMONS

Connecticut is one of the first states to join a new effort to combat the opioid crisis. MedicineSafe aims to coordinate the efforts of many different agencies in keeping addictive painkillers out of the wrong hands.

Carl Jordan Castro / C-Hit.org

Once a week, every week, the health center at Stamford High School offers sophomore Roger Sanchez an oasis—someplace he can talk to a trusted adult about life’s pressures and problems, a place he feels free and unjudged.

School work, sports commitments, family and social obligations: life as a teenager can be stressful, he says. If it weren’t for the health center, conveniently located where he spends most of his days, he would have a much harder time accessing counseling sessions that help him cope with anxiety.

Fibonacci Blue / Creative Commons

The Trump administration is resurrecting a Reagan-era rule that would ban federally funded family planning clinics from discussing abortion with women, or sharing space with abortion providers.

Updated at 11:40 a.m. ET

The Trump administration is reviving a rule that would deny federal family planning funds to organizations that provide abortions or make abortion referrals.

The rule is similar to one in place during the Reagan administration. The proposal was drafted by the Health and Human Services Department and is under review by the White House budget office.

Max Pixel / Creative Commons

Black children are three times more likely to drown in the United States than white children. This hour, we learn the history behind this deadly disparity.

Today we wrap up our series called Seeing Things Differently: Autism Spectrum Disorder. Connecticut Public Radio contributor Dr. Thyde Dumont-Mathieu brings us the voices of four Connecticut mothers, who talk about parenting children who’ve been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. 

Carmen Baskauf / WNPR


Drug-resistant typhoid is sweeping Pakistan, while drug resistant gonorrhea has shown up in England. They’re the latest in a growing list of superbugs that are becoming resistant to antibiotics.

Scott Bauer / Wikimedia Commons

With warmer weather also comes the potential for insect and tick-borne illnesses. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, diseases transmitted by fleas, ticks, and mosquitoes have tripled in just 13 years.

Jamie / Creative Commons

This hour: the deadly reality of counterfeit drugs. We discuss the history and proliferation of fake pharmaceuticals with Dr. Muhammad Zaman, author of Bitter Pills: The Global War on Counterfeit Drugs, and consider their impact both internationally and at home. 

Also: a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention outlines an alarming trend in the U.S. -- fleas, ticks, and mosquitos are on the rise. But what, exactly, is driving the increase? And what does it mean for public health?

Lisa Wilson (top right) with her family in Hartford, Connecticut. Her son was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

A growing body of research indicates that there are disparities based on race and ethnicity in health care overall. This is also true in the field of autism.

Lyme disease was once unheard of in western Pennsylvania, where Barbara Thorne, now an entomologist at the University of Maryland, spent time as a kid.

Thorne knew that if black-legged ticks are infected with bacteria called Borrelia burgdorferi, they can transmit Lyme to people and, that if untreated, symptoms can range from fever, fatigue and a rash, to serious damage to the joints, heart and nervous system.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

A new Connecticut Public Radio series spotlights autism spectrum disorder -- with insight into the lives and experiences of young children and their families.

This hour, we speak with the series' creator, Dr. Thyde Dumont-Mathieu, and hear from a Connecticut mother whose son is on the spectrum.

Seeing Things Differently: Where To Turn For Help Before And After Autism Diagnosis?

May 2, 2018
Lisa Wilson (top right) with her family in Hartford, Connecticut. Her son was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Parent Lisa Wilson wasn’t sure if her son was developing the skills he should for his age. “He wasn't talking as a typical two-year-old would've been talking,” she said.

Feverpitched / Thinkstock

New federal data find that about one in 59 children has autism spectrum disorder.

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