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Health

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A student at Central Connecticut State University is being treated for bacterial meningitis after becoming seriously ill. According to the university, the student is recovering and people who were in close contact with the student were given a course of antibiotics as a precautionary measure.

The Sleep Judge / Creative Commons

Many women who become pregnant miscarry without knowing it. Yet miscarriage is not something we, as a society, often talk about. Why?

This hour, we take an in-depth look and we also hear from you. Have you or a loved one ever miscarried? Where did you turn for support? 

When Maddy Nadeau was a toddler, her mother wasn't able to care for her. "I remember Mom was always locking herself in her room and she didn't take care of me. My mom just wasn't around at the time," she says.

Every day, her older sister Devon came home from elementary school and made sure Maddy had something to eat.

"Devon would come home from school and fix them cold hot dogs or a bowl of cereal — very simple items that both of them could eat," says Sarah Nadeau, who fostered the girls and later adopted them.

This year, high-profile incidents like the deaths of Anthony Bourdain and Kate Spade as well as clusters of suicides among young people in communities all over the country have served as a reminder that suicide is a growing public health issue in the U.S.

If you take the long view, international health organizations have much to be encouraged about when it comes to the global fight against measles. From 2000 to 2017, for instance, the annual number of measles-related deaths dropped 80 percent — from a toll of over half a million to just under 110,000 last year.

courtesy of the Yale New Haven Hospital Archives

It was a plague that came every summer and left thousands of American children paralyzed -- or dead -- in its wake. This hour we take a look at the legacy of polio.

How did the development of the polio vaccine change the course of history?

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After a widespread E. coli outbreak in 12 states including Connecticut, federal health officials issued an unusually broad warning just before Thanksgiving – urging consumers to throw away all romaine lettuce. Now they say the contaminated product originated in parts of California.

Updated at 6:15 a.m. ET

The scientist who stunned the world by claiming he created the first genetically modified babies defended his actions publicly for the first time on Wednesday, saying that editing the genes of the twin girls while they were embryos would protect them from contracting HIV.

He Jiankui of the Southern University of Science and Technology in Shenzhen, China, addressed hundreds of scientists gathered at an international gene- editing summit in Hong Kong that has been rocked by ethical questions swirling around his research.

Thomas Hawk /thomashawk / Flickr

Multiple lawsuits allege Connecticut’s prison system failed to properly diagnose and treat prisoners with serious illnesses. This hour we hear from a mother whose 19-year-old son died of an infection while incarcerated. Scott Semple, the outgoing prisons Commissioner, also joins us. What steps have been taken to improve health care behind bars?

DigiDreamGrafix.com / Creative Commons

Amid reports of consolidations and staffing crises, we ask: What is the future of the U.S. hospital industry? A team of experts joins us as we weigh this question and consider its implications for Connecticut. 

Later, we discuss the role of crowdfunding platforms in helping alleviate the burden of medical expenses. Have you ever turned to GoFundMe or a similar site to finance the cost of treatment? We want to hear from you. 

Gary Ombler / Thinkstock

Open enrollment season is well underway, and Connecticut’s insurance commissioner is warning consumers against junk health plans - after herself being targeted for a scam. 

When Kathy Klute-Nelson heads out on a neighborhood walk, she often takes her two dogs — Kona, a boxer, and Max, a small white dog of questionable pedigree who barrels out the front door with barks of enthusiasm.

The 64-year-old resident of Costa Mesa, Calif., says she was never one to engage in regular exercise — especially after a long day of work. But about three years ago, her employer, the Auto Club of Southern California, made her and her colleagues an offer she couldn't refuse: Wear a Fitbit, walk every day and get up to $300 off your yearly health insurance premiums.

Outreach Programs Target Asthma Hot Spots, But More Help Is Needed

Nov 18, 2018
Robert Carmon, and dad, Chaz demonstrate the inhaler used twice daily to control Robert's asthma.
Steve Hamm / C-HIT.org

Robert Carmon had a rough start to life. Shortly after birth he developed asthma, a chronic disease that causes inflammation in the lungs and difficulty breathing. His attacks were so severe as an infant that his parents rushed him to the emergency room practically every week. They were terrified he might die.

Kathrine Holte

The repeated incidents of mass shootings are shocking. Yet, they're sanitized and abstract for most of us who haven't been directly touched by gun violence.

The response to mass shootings has become predictable: anguished adults, candlelight vigils, and photos and remembrances of the victims in happier times. It's never about the carnage or the lingering impact on survivors or their families, communities,  medical doctors, nurses and psychiatrists who care for them. 

Miscarriage is "lonely, painful, and demoralizing," Michelle Obama writes in her new memoir. Yet, by some estimates, it ends as many as 1 in 5 pregnancies before the 20-week mark.

The former first lady's disclosure that she and former President Barack Obama suffered from fertility issues, including losing a pregnancy, has sparked conversations about miscarriage, a common but also commonly misunderstood loss.

About a hundred students at the Emory School of Medicine gathered during lunch earlier this fall, scarfing down their meal before a panel discussion. They came, on their own time, to learn how to talk to their future patients about gun safety. They only had an hour.

Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

Some folks see chipped paint on windowsills and door frames of older Connecticut homes as rustic, New England charm. But it makes public health officials wary.

The U.S. banned lead-based paint for housing in 1978. By then, many homes in the state were already constructed.

thetruthpreneur / Creative Commons

The National Council for Adoption has reported a decline in U.S. intercountry adoptions since the year 2004.

This hour, we discuss the factors driving this downward shift and consider how it compares to trends in the adoption of children born domestically.

We also hear from two Connecticut residents with unique adoption experiences -- one as an adoptive father, the other as an adopted son.

If you have an adoption story you want to share, we want to hear from you, too.

Marco Verch / Creative Commons

What are the short- and long-term benefits of receiving continuous health care?

This hour, we talk with the medical director of the Washington, D.C.-based Robert Graham Center.

We also hear from three Connecticut-based doctors, who tell us how technology and innovation are revolutionizing the way care is delivered.  

Have you heard of telemedicine? What about subscription-based concierge services? We want to hear from you, too. 

Access Health CT

The federal health care law was known as Obamacare. And Republicans, including President Trump, campaigned on repealing it.  

Midwives Could Be Key To Reversing Maternal Mortality Trends

Nov 1, 2018
Caitlin DePasquale of Norwalk looks on as midwife Lindsay Lachant measures her abdomen during Depasquale's appointment at the Connecticut Childbirth & Women's Center in Danbury.
Credit: Melanie Stengel / C-HIT.org

The Connecticut Childbirth & Women’s Center in Danbury is a 50-minute drive from Evelyn DeGraf’s home in Westchester. Pregnant with her second child, the 37-year-old didn’t hesitate to make the drive—she wanted her birth to be attended by a midwife, not a doctor.

Danielle Vukadinovich is sitting up in a hospital bed at the Inova Women's Hospital in Falls Church, Va., waiting to give birth.

"I feel good, I'm excited!" says Vukadinovich, 35, of Annandale, Va., "Nervous, but good!"

Vukadinovich is getting a cesarean section today. It's the second time for her — she underwent the surgical procedure 19 months ago when her twins were born.

scyther5/iStock / Thinkstock

The use of e-cigarettes, or vaping, has doubled among Connecticut high schoolers in recent years. Between 2015 and 2017, vaping went from seven percent of the high school population, to almost 15 percent. 

Credit: Charles Williams (Flickr) / Creative Commons

A new opioid tracking program reports an average of 42 overdoses a month in a section of Hartford.

courtesy of the Yale New Haven Hospital Archives

It was a plague that came every summer and left thousands of American children paralyzed -- or dead -- in its wake. This hour we take a look at the legacy of polio.

How did the development of the polio vaccine change the course of history?

Medicare To Penalize 27 Hospitals For High Readmissions

Oct 11, 2018
Waterbury Rep-Am via C-HIT.org

Most Connecticut hospitals will lose a portion of their Medicare reimbursement payments over the next year as penalties for having high rates of patients being readmitted, new data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) show.

A view of the forest canopy near the site of the discovery of the barrels.
Photo by Jason Moon and Allie Gutierrez

Marco Verch / Creative Commons

In the office; on the scale.

To what extent have physicians and other medical professionals contributed to the stigmatization of obesity? This hour, we take an in-depth look.

We also discuss the effects of obesity and weight stigma on children. What responsibilities do parents, pediatricians, and educators share in keeping kids healthy and safe? 

Consumers Feel Sticker Shock As Out-Of-Pocket Health Care Costs Rise

Oct 2, 2018
Lauren Goldstein (left) and her wife, Joan Goldstein, are fighting their insurance company's refusal to pay a $3,094 ER bill.
Carl Jordan Castro / C-HIT

In February, Joan Goldstein of Monroe received a panicked call for help from her wife, Lauren Goldstein. Joan found Lauren rolled up like a ball on the floor in her office bathroom. “I have never seen her sick in 15 years,” Joan said.

DigiDreamGrafix.com / Creative Commons

Amid reports of consolidations and staffing crises, we ask: What is the future of the U.S. hospital industry? A team of experts joins us as we weigh this question and consider its implications for Connecticut. 

Later, we discuss the role of crowdfunding platforms in helping alleviate the burden of medical expenses. Have you ever turned to GoFundMe or a similar site to finance the cost of treatment? We want to hear from you. 

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