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Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

Some folks see chipped paint on windowsills and door frames of older Connecticut homes as rustic, New England charm. But it makes public health officials wary.

The U.S. banned lead-based paint for housing in 1978. By then, many homes in the state were already constructed.

thetruthpreneur / Creative Commons

The National Council for Adoption has reported a decline in U.S. intercountry adoptions since the year 2004.

This hour, we discuss the factors driving this downward shift and consider how it compares to trends in the adoption of children born domestically.

We also hear from two Connecticut residents with unique adoption experiences -- one as an adoptive father, the other as an adopted son.

If you have an adoption story you want to share, we want to hear from you, too.

Marco Verch / Creative Commons

What are the short- and long-term benefits of receiving continuous health care?

This hour, we talk with the medical director of the Washington, D.C.-based Robert Graham Center.

We also hear from three Connecticut-based doctors, who tell us how technology and innovation are revolutionizing the way care is delivered.  

Have you heard of telemedicine? What about subscription-based concierge services? We want to hear from you, too. 

Access Health CT

The federal health care law was known as Obamacare. And Republicans, including President Trump, campaigned on repealing it.  

Midwives Could Be Key To Reversing Maternal Mortality Trends

Nov 1, 2018
Caitlin DePasquale of Norwalk looks on as midwife Lindsay Lachant measures her abdomen during Depasquale's appointment at the Connecticut Childbirth & Women's Center in Danbury.
Credit: Melanie Stengel / C-HIT.org

The Connecticut Childbirth & Women’s Center in Danbury is a 50-minute drive from Evelyn DeGraf’s home in Westchester. Pregnant with her second child, the 37-year-old didn’t hesitate to make the drive—she wanted her birth to be attended by a midwife, not a doctor.

Danielle Vukadinovich is sitting up in a hospital bed at the Inova Women's Hospital in Falls Church, Va., waiting to give birth.

"I feel good, I'm excited!" says Vukadinovich, 35, of Annandale, Va., "Nervous, but good!"

Vukadinovich is getting a cesarean section today. It's the second time for her — she underwent the surgical procedure 19 months ago when her twins were born.

scyther5/iStock / Thinkstock

The use of e-cigarettes, or vaping, has doubled among Connecticut high schoolers in recent years. Between 2015 and 2017, vaping went from seven percent of the high school population, to almost 15 percent. 

Credit: Charles Williams (Flickr) / Creative Commons

A new opioid tracking program reports an average of 42 overdoses a month in a section of Hartford.

courtesy of the Yale New Haven Hospital Archives

It was a plague that came every summer and left thousands of American children paralyzed -- or dead -- in its wake. This hour we take a look at the legacy of polio.

How the development of the polio vaccine changed the course of history?

Medicare To Penalize 27 Hospitals For High Readmissions

Oct 11, 2018
Waterbury Rep-Am via C-HIT.org

Most Connecticut hospitals will lose a portion of their Medicare reimbursement payments over the next year as penalties for having high rates of patients being readmitted, new data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) show.

A view of the forest canopy near the site of the discovery of the barrels.
Photo by Jason Moon and Allie Gutierrez

Marco Verch / Creative Commons

In the office; on the scale.

To what extent have physicians and other medical professionals contributed to the stigmatization of obesity? This hour, we take an in-depth look.

We also discuss the effects of obesity and weight stigma on children. What responsibilities do parents, pediatricians, and educators share in keeping kids healthy and safe? 

Consumers Feel Sticker Shock As Out-Of-Pocket Health Care Costs Rise

Oct 2, 2018
Lauren Goldstein (left) and her wife, Joan Goldstein, are fighting their insurance company's refusal to pay a $3,094 ER bill.
Carl Jordan Castro / C-HIT

In February, Joan Goldstein of Monroe received a panicked call for help from her wife, Lauren Goldstein. Joan found Lauren rolled up like a ball on the floor in her office bathroom. “I have never seen her sick in 15 years,” Joan said.

DigiDreamGrafix.com / Creative Commons

Amid reports of consolidations and staffing crises, we ask: What is the future of the U.S. hospital industry? A team of experts joins us as we weigh this question and consider its implications for Connecticut. 

Later, we discuss the role of crowdfunding platforms in helping alleviate the burden of medical expenses. Have you ever turned to GoFundMe or a similar site to finance the cost of treatment? We want to hear from you. 

UW Health / Creative Commons

The rate of people without health insurance in rural Connecticut has gone down dramatically since the passage of the Affordable Care Act.

That’s the takeaway message from a new report on health insurance out of Georgetown University’s Center for Children and Families. Edwin Park, a research professor at the center, said the key to the drop is the state’s expansion of Medicaid to include more people.

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