WNPR

Environment

Mystic Country CT (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Connecticut and New York are butting heads over a controversial decision by the federal Environmental Protection Agency to allow dumping of dredged material in Long Island Sound. It’s an unusual split between two states that have been pretty lockstep in suing the EPA.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Three developers have submitted bids to sell offshore wind to Connecticut. That could mean big things for New London's economy, but officials and advocates said the state needs to act fast to ensure it doesn't miss the boat.

Henry Hemming / Creative Commons

Although we grow this plant as a perennial flower, it has other devious uses. During the siege of Kirrha in ancient Greece, the invading armies poisoned the city's water supply with crushed roots and leaves of this flower.

New science is bearing down on a poorly understood part of the North American lobster’s diet. And it turns out that a tiny crustacean’s abundance may help to explain expected declines in Maine’s lobster harvest.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A federal budget cycle akin to a wild roller coaster ride ended up boosting funding for some environmental work. With his signature last week, President Donald Trump signed into law a $1.3 trillion spending package that shores up funding for two conservation and research programs in Long Island Sound.

Kim Unertl / Creative Commons

Let's get a little wild with our greens. I'm going start with mache. My Swiss friend calls it lamb's lettuce because she remembers harvesting it, in early spring, in fields when lambs were born. Mache has a mild taste and is great with eggs.

Massachusetts energy officials have announced they're going with Plan B to bring Canadian hydroelectric power to the Bay State.

They've selected a back-up project that runs transmission lines through Maine, after New Hampshire state regulators refused to allow Plan A – the controversial Northern Pass project.

But the Maine project, known as New England Clean Energy Connect, also faces an uncertain future.

In Massachusetts, the announcement got kudos and criticism from those closely watching the state's selection of a massive clean energy project:

CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY

The endangered North Atlantic right whale population took a big hit last year, with a record number killed by fishing gear entanglements and ship strikes. Now, an ongoing debate over threats posed by Maine's lobster industry is gaining new urgency.

Jonathan McNicol / WNPR

No one likes a cloudy sky. A cloud on the horizon is seen as a harbinger of doom. We feel like clouds need to have silver linings.

But here's our thesis: Clouds are unfairly maligned.

tinatinatinatinatina (Flickr) / Creative Commons

It's the latest darling of the vegetable world. It's found in salads, sautées, chips, and even shakes. This cabbage family crop has been around for years, but now it's a rock star. We've always known it’s nutritious, but with newer varieties and some good PR, it's sexy, too!

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

It’s an elevator pitch Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy has made a lot. Climate change is real. It’s man-made. And it’s here. But, he thinks the state could do better.

Wikimedia Commons

Following the death of a man on the Merritt Parkway this month, officials say more tree trimming alongside state highways is needed.

Michael Levine-Clark (Flickr) / Creative Commons

This spring flowering bulb was first brought to Europe from its native Middle East in the 1500s. It was mostly grown for the fall blooming species used for making an expensive cooking spice. However, most gardeners know it for the early blooming varieties that herald spring. It's the crocus.

OregonDOT / Creative Commons

Think of “shared solar” as a community garden, but for energy.

Corydalis incisa
mio-spr (Flickr) / Creative Commons

While we plant spring flowering bulbs to naturalize in our meadows and woods, there are some naturally occurring ones that you can just help along. Corydalis is a tuberous plant that forms a carpet-like, ground cover of pink or white blooms each spring.

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