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Education

You've probably heard of New Haven Promise by now.  It's a scholarship program funded by Yale University and community partners which awards New Haven public school students who show academic potential.

But the Promise program isn't just about paying tuition for some.

WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil spoke with New Haven Promise Executive Director Emily Brynes about the program's community outreach.

 

Cheating Schools

Aug 18, 2011
albertogp123

The state is investigating teachers and staff at a Waterbury elementary school about suspected cheating on the 2011 Connecticut Mastery Tests.

This follows widespread cheating scandals uncovered in the District of Columbia, Baltimore and Atlanta…just this year.  In a story this month, the magazine Education Week put it this way:

“As long as test scores are used in any field to make decisions on rewards or punishments, including for schools or educators, a small percentage of people will be willing to bend the rules - or break them.”

Governor Malloy addressed the state’s school superintendents on Wednesday and presented his vision for a state education system that better prepares students for the kinds of jobs Connecticut employers can offer.

Governor Malloy began an impassioned 20-minute speech on education by describing why as a kid,  he loathed school. "..because I had a very different experience than a lot of my peers, having grown up with learning disabilities and not having reached any great level of achievement until late in high school."

Governor Malloy visited Wesleyan University in Middletown on Monday.  He met with leaders of Connecticut’s private colleges and universities to talk jobs.

The Connecticut Conference of Independent Colleges represents 16 schools that employ over 22,000 people.  

Hariadhi via Wikimedia Commons

Despite the high stakes attached to its multimillion-dollar statewide school testing program, new allegations of cheating show that Connecticut--like many other states--relies almost entirely on local districts to spot and report fraud.

An apparent cheating scandal at a Waterbury elementary school on the Connecticut Mastery Test came to light only after Waterbury officials alerted that state last month that something was amiss.

An investigator for the State Department of Education has begun to question teachers and staff at a Waterbury elementary school about suspected cheating on the 2011 Connecticut Mastery Tests.  This is the latest in a string of cheating scandals nationwide.

17 teachers and other employees at Hopeville School in Waterbury have been placed on leave as an investigator looks into possible test tampering.  A preliminary review showed many wrong answers on this year’s CMTS had been erased and corrected.  

In New Haven, Head Start Hits the Road

Aug 3, 2011

An early education program in New Haven reaches more than 800 families in the city each year. The Head Start program hit the road this week, looking to recruit a few more.

Outside a Stop and Shop grocery store on Whalley Avenue in New Haven, Damaris Rodriguez is walking a parent through how to register her three year old for the New Haven Public Schools Head Start program.

"You're going to need the child's birth certificate long form, proof of residence, a utility bill or a lease in your name or your husband's name."

Photo by Jurvetson (Flickr)

When the space shuttle Atlantis lifted off on its final mission earlier this month, it brought along a little bit of Hartford with it. A group of eighth graders from the Annie Fisher STEM Magnet School in Hartford's North End wanted to measure the effect of microgravity on Tomato growth, so they wrote a proposal and it was accepted.

We talk to principal Melony Brady about her students' project.

Diane Orson

More than 100 students were honored on Thursday as the first class of New Haven Promise.  That’s the new scholarship program that provides college tuition for city students. 

Wearing caps and gowns, New Haven public high school graduates filed into Sprague Hall on the Yale University campus.  Parents beamed.  City and state officials told the students that the Promise scholarship program was an expression of confidence in their promise for a brighter future.   

The Book 2.0

Jul 21, 2011
goXunuReviews, Creative Commons

Borders Books reached its height in 2005 with more than 1,200 bookstores around the world. In a few weeks, there will be no more.

The National School Boards Association represents state boards of education across the country, and their 90 thousand members.  The Association’s new president is a school board member from Connecticut.

For the past two decades, the achievement gap between Hispanic students and their white classmates nationwide has remained largely unchanged. Hispanic students perform about two grade levels below their white peers in math and reading.

Connecticut has one of the largest gaps in the nation, and a new study finds the problem exists in every school district in the state.

White students in Connecticut are two to three times more likely than Hispanic students to achieve at or above goal on the Connecticut Mastery Tests. 

Diane Orson / WNPR

A special summer program has just wrapped up at a New Haven elementary school.  But  in this class the students are parents. 

It’s the final day of his year’s parent training program at Lincoln-Bassett School in New Haven.  Brenda Whitfield is telling the class of about 20 parents, what she’s learned. "I found out a lot of stuff about the math I can tell my granddaughter and my grandson. And I learned a lot about the science. I just learned so much while I was here at the training."

The Education Takeover

Jul 13, 2011

The city of Bridgeport is the latest struggling school district to be taken over by the state.

The Board of Education in the city has essentially voted to dissolve itself - to be replaced by an oversight board hand-picked by the State Department of Education.

A former Bridgeport Board of Education president says he and many city residents were surprised by the state’s quick takeover of the troubled school system.  

Max Medina Jr. says in 16 years serving on Bridgeport’s Board of Education he’s never seen anything quite as speedy as the recent decision by the state to intervene in the city’s schools.

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