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Education

Adult Education...For Teens

Jan 20, 2012
Neena Satija

In the previous segment of our three-part series, we heard about students who leave the traditional public school system for so-called alternative schools. But more and more teens are choosing adult education programs instead, often to finish school more quickly. In the final segment, WNPR’s Neena Satija asks if these students are getting the same education.

(Noise from a classroom; students talking with the teacher)

Connecticut's "Alternative Schools"

Jan 18, 2012
Chion Wolf

Thousands of students leave their traditional public high schools each year for what are called alternative schools. They’re meant to provide smaller class sizes and more individual instruction for struggling students. But since the state doesn’t define the meaning of alternative and doesn’t collect data from many of these schools, it’s hard to know if they’re achieving their goals. WNPR’s Neena Satija reports in the second of a three-part series. (Listen to the first segment here.)

Pushed Out?

Jan 18, 2012

Thousands of public school students in Connecticut don’t get their diplomas each year, but only some are called “dropouts.” So what happens to the others? This is the first of a three-part series on how kids leave the school system without officially “dropping out.”

A spokesman for the New Haven Public Schools is leaving his post following an incident in which he grabbed a reporter’s camera while she was on assignment and insisted that she stop filming. More and more school districts are employing public relations professionals. We take a look at the field, at a time when people want more information about what’s going on in their local schools.

Diane Orson

Parents packed into an elementary school gymnasium in Middletown last night to hear from local education officials, and to voice their concerns over so-called “scream rooms.” Teachers at the school use a time-out room to discipline disruptive students.

monado, Flickr Creative Commons

If you're anything like me, your knowledge of neutrinos goes something like this:

  • They are extremely small. Smaller than other really small things.
     
  • John Updike wrote a poem about them.

There's something inherently funny about them. It might be their name. It might be something more than that. And then maybe you saw the coverage of the experiment in which neutrinos appeared to move faster than light.

The Education Session

Jan 10, 2012
Chion Wolf / WNPR

Governor Malloy has called this upcoming legislative session “The Education Session.”

You can see why. Connecticut has one of the worst achievement gaps in the nation. Students in wealthy, suburban schools do as well - or better - than any in the country.

2012: Connecticut's "Year For Education Reform"

Jan 5, 2012

Hundreds of Connecticut legislators, teachers, parents, and activists gathered at Central Connecticut State University today to discuss the need for education reform in the state. WNPR’s Neena Satija reports.

Diane Orson

Connecticut’s largest teachers union added its voice on Tuesday to a growing chorus of proposals for school reform.  The union’s plan addresses the controversial issue of teacher tenure.

Connecticut Education Association Executive Director Mary Loftus Levine says teachers are proposing to replace tenure with a streamlined dismissal process, "...to remove underperforming teachers and also allow for due process. We want teachers to be evaluated."

But she says, a teacher’s performance should not be judged solely by test scores.

Flickr Creative Commons, dierk schaefer

David Weinberger, our guest today, argues that our reservoir of information has become so huge and complicated that one of the standard activities of knowledge-making -- shaping facts into testable theories and equations -- doesn't really work any more. Scientists take data and build models. Then they watch the models to see what happens.

Education Commissioner Stefan Pryor describes new figures on high school graduation rates in Connecticut as “unacceptable”. Students in poverty and students are color are far less likely to finish high school in four years.

Overall, nearly one in five Connecticut students fails to graduate high school in four years according to new data from the State Department of Education. But for kids who live at or below the poverty level, are Hispanic or black, in special ed or are English language learners -  it's one in three.

Bridgeport’s Board of Education has appointed Paul Vallas, interim superintendent, part of the state’s takeover of the struggling school system. Vallas is a nationally recognized education reformer who’s spearheaded turnaround efforts in Chicago, Philadelphia and New Orleans. 

Departing Bridgeport superintendent John Ramos joined a panel of school leaders earlier this month to talk about the effect of inadequate education funding on disadvantaged students. 

Diane Orson

Think college music program in Connecticut and the Hartt School of Music springs to mind. There’s the Yale School of Music and Wesleyan’s ethnomusicology program. Now, a report on the quiet transformation of Southern Connecticut State University’s Music Department – thanks to the generosity of a state resident.

SCSU student Andrew Pinto sings a song he composed. Pinto, a music theory major, says he’s benefited from free private singing lessons at Southern.  

Educating Bullies

Dec 22, 2011

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