Education | Connecticut Public Radio
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Education

David DesRoches / WNPR

Schools throughout rural Connecticut have been shrinking or closing for years. Many districts have consolidated with neighboring towns to pool resources, in a process called regionalization.

And some schools – like Burnham School in Bridgewater – have taken a more creative approach.

The Harvard University admissions trial comes to a close on Friday. At the heart of this controversial federal lawsuit is the question of just how much a school can consider race in admissions.

The plaintiff, a group called Students for Fair Admissions, has accused Harvard of discriminating against Asian-American applicants. It argues the school considers race too much, forcing Asian-Americans to meet a higher bar to get in.

Dave White / Creative Commons

For interview highlights from this show, click here. 

It’s been fifteen years since the death of Fred Rogers -- a man who, for decades, served as the cardigan-donning host and creator of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.

Rogers’ life is now the focus of a new Maxwell King biography -- aptly titled The Good Neighbor. This hour, we sit down with King for a special preview of the book. 

WNPR/David DesRoches

A federal judge is expected to rule soon on whether a case against Hartford’s magnet school system can proceed to trial. A group of parents and activists are challenging the school system’s insistence that it maintain racial diversity - even if that means leaving seats empty. 

ccarlstead / Creative Commons

In the 1996 landmark Sheff v. O’Neill case, the Connecticut Supreme Court found that minority students in Hartford's public schools “suffered daily” due to racial and economic segregation.

Now, 22 years later -- Connecticut’s magnet school solution to Sheff’s desegregation mandate has been held up as a model for integration around the country. Yet many minority students in Hartford still attend struggling and highly segregated schools.

Update: Many student borrowers have responded to this story by sharing stories of their struggles with PSLF. We've curated many of them here.

On the morning of Monday, Aug. 27, Seth Frotman told his two young daughters that he would likely be home early that day and could take them to the playground. They cheered.

Governor Dannel Malloy

A music teacher at Warren Harding High School in Bridgeport has been named the Connecticut Teacher of the Year.

A federal lawsuit alleging Harvard University discriminates against Asian-American applicants goes to court this week in Boston.

While the case focuses on Harvard, it could have big consequences for higher education, especially if it moves on to the U.S. Supreme Court. At stake is 40 years of legal precedent allowing race to be one factor in deciding which students to admit.

Amar Batra / Connecticut Public Radio

Instead of honoring explorer Christopher Columbus, the second Monday of October will soon be called Indigenous Peoples’ Day on the school calendar in West Hartford.

The Federico Mathew Baez in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico closed over a year ago.  Now, community members are working to turn it into a community center.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

This used to be Gamaliel Laboy Andino’s school. But he doesn’t go here anymore. No one does -- not since the government closed it more than a year ago. It saddened him, he said, because there are students who now have to go to school far away.

“It makes me sad, because there are students who don’t have anywhere to go,” he said.

Democratic candidate for governor Jay Gonzalez announced a proposal on Wednesday to tax private colleges in Massachusetts to pay for his transportation and education plans.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Advanced Placement test scores continue to rise in Connecticut, as does the number of students taking them.

David DesRoches/WNPR

Owen Lynch likes to keep to himself, even when he's playing a video game against 100 other players. His survival strategy in games is much like his strategy in life -- avoid other people.

Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

Julissa Mota can recall the exact moment when squash — the preppy racquet sport — entered her consciousness.

Visitors had stopped by Julissa's fifth-grade class at M.D. Fox School, a neighborhood school in Hartford's South End. Capitol Squash, an urban squash program, was new and recruiting kids in 2014, so the executive director brought along a coach and a big blue box with racquets inside for the children to pass around.

Graduate Max Johnson, New Haven Mayor Toni Harp, Governor Dannel Malloy.
Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

A San Francisco-based software engineering school is opening a new location in Connecticut. 

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