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Remembrance

George H.W. Bush Receives Final Funeral In Houston

Former president George H.W. Bush was remembered by his grandson as gracious, decent and humble, as he received his final public memorial ceremony at St. Martin's Episcopal Church in Houston on Thursday. The funeral came after several days of remembrance in the nation's capital. Bush died last week at the age of 94. He will be buried in a private ceremony on Thursday afternoon. On Wednesday, the former president received a state funeral at Washington National Cathedral in the nation's capital...

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Lagging In Polls, McMahon Claims "Underdog" Status

Nov 1, 2010
Deirdre Shesgreen, Connecticut Mirror

Republican Linda McMahon called herself the "underdog" on Sunday, even as she disputed recent polls showing her behind Democrat Richard Blumenthal and touted a sophisticated field operation assembled by her $42 million-plus U.S. Senate campaign.

"I like being the underdog," McMahon told a crowd of several hundred well-heeled voters at a Republican rally in Darien. "We are undaunted."

JOHN WOIKE / HARTFORD COURANT / October 31, 2010

Former President Bill Clinton told a partisan audience of 2,000 at the University of Hartford on Sunday night that Republicans have waged "a fact-free campaign" to convince America they are blameless for the recession. 

Out in Connecticut: Fleurette King

Oct 29, 2010

Fleurette King is the director of the Rainbow Center at the University of Connecticut in Storrs. The mission of the Rainbow Center is to serve the diversity of the UConn Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Questioning, and Allied community and to provide resources and services to the wider community of students, faculty, staff, and local residents.

A state court judge said she would not immediately rule on the lawsuit brought by Republican Martha Dean that tries to disqualify Democrat George Jepsen from the race for attorney general. Dean filed suit earlier this week claiming that Jepsen didn’t have the required legal experience to serve as attorney general.

Can Malloy Win Without a No-Tax Pledge?

Oct 29, 2010
Photo by Paul Bass

As his opponent took a no-new-taxes pledge—and pulled even in the polls—Democrat Dan Malloy brought his gubernatorial campaign to the lunch-cart crowd by the hospital, determined to defend two unpopular positions with more than sound bites.

Days away from Tuesday’s election, Malloy at this last stage finds himself confronting the political version of those two verities facing all of mankind: death and taxes.

If you've noticed the political campaigns this year, they haven't exactly been rich with issues and evidence.   You're more likely to hear emotions, anger, empathy and fear. This is the world that Drew Westen studies. He is professor of psychology and psychiatry at Emory University, and author of The Political Brain: The Role of Emotion in Deciding the Fate of the Nation (2007), an  investigation into the role of emotion in determining the political life of the nation.

A prominent UConn law professor has been tapped to advise the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, founded under the Dodd-Frank financial reform act. Patricia McCoy will be working on mortgages. McCoy is the director of UConn law school’s Insurance Law Center and an expert on consumer finance issues. She’s been a prominent commentator on the foreclosure crisis, and an advocate of protecting the rights of homeowners who were the victims of predatory lending.

When Natural Resources Play A Role In War

Oct 29, 2010
Sommerkom, Wikipedia

The Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies is hosting a panel discussion Monday afternoon on the role of forest management in the Afghanistan conflict. It’s not unusual for valuable natural resources, such as timber or diamonds, to play a role in military conflicts. For example, about a decade ago, the regime in  cut down forests and used the money from timber sales to buy weapons.

In the Vietnam War, the United States destroyed trees, using the herbicide Agent Orange, as a way to deny the enemy cover.

Credit Greg Verdino/Flickr Creative Commons

It’s commencement weekend for many colleges and universities in Connecticut. Among them is Wesleyan University in Middletown, where there’s been a lot of talk this year about a subject that’s often buried in a culture of silence: campus sexual assault.

In the first of a series of stories on the issue, WNPR’s Diane Orson reports on how the university judicial process handled the case of a 2010 graduating senior named Eve, who’s asked that we not use her last name.

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USFWS / Progressive Animal Welfare Society (PAWS) / Creative Commons

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